Winter Rules All Season Long
By Snyper on 8/9/10
Matt Snyder is an opinionated* golf enthusiast from Pennsylvania. He coaches at the high school level, molding the minds and swings of our next generation. Feel free to chime in with your thoughts and opinions of Matt in the comments. Don't hold back- because Matt won't.

Most everyone that plays golf knows that it is not legal to touch your golf ball from the time that you tee off until after you hole out. However, there are some special circumstances that allow for "winter rules" to govern play. Under this set of regulations, players are allowed to mark their ball, clean it, and place the ball within one club length (or sometimes one grip length) from the original lie, unless that original lie is in a hazard. We refer to these regulations as "winter rules" because most of us amateurs still like to play during the colder months of the year when the grass has stopped growing and the course conditions have deteriorated. During that time, since there is little grass, there are rarely any good lies to come by naturally and playing would not be enjoyable at all if you couldn't move your ball to a feasible lie. However, during the warmers seasons, winter rules are occasionally instated because of unusually wet conditions. If the course is soaked, balls will often plug or collect large amounts of mud, which can ruin shots and create impossible lies. Thus, winter rules make the course playable when conditions would otherwise make it unplayable.

However, when you make a perfect swing and you do everything possible to ensure a good result, that's exactly what you should get.

Ok, those are the reasons and circumstances that surround winter rules. Now, I want to make an argument for why winter rules should always be a part of the game. First of all, let me specify by saying that I believe that winter rules should always be part of the game for shots that are in your fairway only. In other words, I believe that if you hit the ball off the tee and into the fairway, you should be allowed to improve your lie if necessary. Think about it. What is the best possible thing you can do when you are hitting your tee shot? If you hit the best possible shot, you hit it down the middle and long. You’ve done everything you can possibly do by stripping it with good solid contact. But, you are still not guaranteed to have a decent lie for your next shot! Is that fair? Absolutely not! Once that ball lands on the fairway, your future depends solely on luck. If your ball ends up in some sort of depression, hole, or divot, you are at a distinct disadvantage on your next shot. Is it your fault that this happened? No. In fact, you could be suffering from someone else’s ignorance. Why should that be part of our great game?

Listen; if you hit it in the rough or in a bunker or in someone else's fairway, then you reap what you sow. Bad swings should have consequences and sometimes, those consequences are worse than others. However, when you make a perfect swing and you do everything possible to ensure a good result, that's exactly what you should get. Are you allowed to fix ball marks on the green? Are you allowed to mark your ball, clean it, and replace it on the green? Why is that any different than the fairway? If you hit a good second shot and put your ball on the green, being allowed to do all of those things is your reward. However, if you hit a good first shot, you have to be lucky to be rewarded with a good lie! That is a double standard that I believe should not be part of golf at all.

Instead of screwing around with grooves, the USGA should consider this change to make the pros care a little more about hitting fairways.

If it were up to me, the same rules that apply on the green would apply in the fairway. Additionally, you would have a standard grip length from where you marked your ball (obviously no closer to the hole) to replace it. This would ensure that, after you hit a perfect shot, you weren't forced to play from a bad lie that was created by one of your competitors. The other thing that this rule change would create is even more of a premium on hitting fairways. Instead of screwing around with grooves, the USGA should consider this change to make the pros care a little more about hitting fairways.

Trust me, I’m about as close to a purist and traditionalist as you can find, but there is no room for a great round of golf to be ruined by someone else’s ignorance. And, I should also mention that it doesn’t have to be ignorance that leaves divots. Sometimes, the grass just blows up and there is no divot to replace. In those cases, even if the divot is filled with sand, the next player to end up in it is punished by an unavoidable situation. I vote for correcting the rules so that this situation can be avoided. It makes no fundamental sense for someone to be punished for hitting a great shot. So, why is it a part of the game of golf? Until the NFL starts subtracting points from a team’s score for every time they earn a first down and MLB takes runs away from a team when they get a base hit, golf shouldn’t penalize its’ players for hitting the ball in the fairway.


* Matt's views and opinions are his own do not necessarily reflect those of oobgolf.


photo source


[ comments ]
bducharm says:
Matt, that is why golf is a 4 letter word - it's not fair! We play the ball as it lies - no questions asked. If there is lift, clean, and place because of inclement conditions, so be it. But please, not all the time! I personally have gotten into some pretty tough lies in my own fairway because of others disregard for the course. Rub of the green as it is called, my friend. I have actually hit some pretty darn good shots out of divots. I practice those shots on the range so it is not foreign to me if and when it happens. Don't give in...
8/9/10
 
tennesseeboy says:
I'm with charm on this one. Divots are part of the game. It's not fair when your ball end up in a divot. It's also not fair when you shank a shot into the woods and it bounces off a tree and ends up in the middle of the fairway. We take what the course gives us either way. Rub of the green.
8/9/10
 
mjaber says:
So, how do you propose to fix the luck working the other way? If I hit a wicked slice that catches a tree just right, ricochets forward, bounces down the cart path and then into the fairway leaving me a 50 yard pitch for my 2nd into a par5, do I have to pick it up and hurl it into the woods? Luck works both ways (good and bad), so if you're going to improve your lie when you get a bad break, you should do the same when the little leprechaun is sitting on your shoulder and smiling.
8/9/10
 
lcgolfer64 says:
@Bducharm
My only argument with "that is why golf is a 4 letter word - it's not fair! We play the ball as it lies - no questions asked."

Because its follwed with "If there is lift, clean, and place because of inclement conditions, so be it."

So then in true purist fashion, are we honestly playing 'as it lies?'
8/9/10
 
Dixon Golf says:
This argument is kind of a slippery slope. It's a game played by humans, and bad luck is unfortunately a part of that. If the purpose is to level the playing field, the playing field is already level by using standard rules. Everyone has the same chance of bad luck.
8/9/10
 
falcon50driver says:
GOOD POINT
8/9/10
 
jev says:
What's next, replace the grass with artificial grass? Carpet greens? Nah, sometimes you're lucky, sometimes you're not. That's how it is, I wouldn't want it otherwise!
8/9/10
 
Kickntrue says:
I agree with most of the things said here- but I do think Matt is trying to speak to a different audience. If you're still learning the finer points of the game- why torment yourself to the "letter of the rules" when you've done something good? Forget being in a divot- how about the times you've played courses in un-perfect conditions and hit a perfect ball in the fairway that is in a hole, or on dead grass, or on a strip of grass that didn't get mowed, etc...? The guys playing for money never deal with that... plus they have a gallery to keep their terrible shots from becoming TOO terrible (See Phil Mickelson, Tiger Woods, etc..).
8/9/10
 
Banker85 says:
i know some people who do this regularly to give themselves a better lie. I cant stand it. Now if i am playing a course and it is soaked and the ball gts plugged you bet i am not trying to hit that shot. but to pick up and clean and replace in the fairway seems like cheating to me.
8/9/10
 
svj says:
i agree with matt on this one. only for the base is that you get to do it on the greens. why not just play it down on the greens, without marking it, cleaning it, lining it up. off the tee, your goal is to hit the fairway and than you get punched in the face, when you walk up to your ball and it is in a 4 inch hole. (mental note to self, hit in the rough, more grass). some courses, well courses around southeastern ohio, there isn't much different from the fairways and rough. i understand life isn't fair, you work 40 hrs a week at job you hate, to buy stuff that will break that will need repairs, your get married and don't have sex anymore, you eat heathly crappy food to stay in shape and have energy. you play golf to get a way and enjoy the outside, just to feel dissapointed because of that 7 you took in the fairway on 11, lol.
8/9/10
 
SingleDigits says:
I also think it's the bad lies that separate the skilled golfers from the rest. Knowing how to play the ball when it's in a divot, on a slope, on a bare patch of ground, fried egg in a bunker, next to the wall on the Road Hole, etc., makes you a better golfer (and brings out your creativity).

I'm all for improving lies for beginners. I encourage them to take their ball out of the rough or bunkers if they're still learning how to swing a club. But if you're playing the game for the long term, your skill will grow by practicing & playing all the shots (good & bad).
8/9/10
 
ElGalloGigante says:
I don't honestly know how I feel about this. I'm not a purist in any form and when playing with friends, we generally let some things slide (i.e. You hit it OB but found it and can play it from there? Go for it.) from time to time, but the fact that it's not encouraged makes it easier to live with. Waiting on someone to "improve" a lie thats in the fairway already, and is backed by the rules, just seems silly to me.
8/9/10
 
DougE says:
My opinion is that the rules are the rules, but only when you are playing against someone, whether it be in a club tournament, or a friendly 2-bucks-a-hole foursome. On the other hand, if you are paying 50 or 60 bucks for a round of golf and rarely get the chance to play, you can do what ever the hell you damn well please. Take 10 mulligans a round for all I care. It's your game and your money. As long as I'm not playing in a match against you, why should I care what you do? Not improving your lie is certainly fair for everyone, when it counts. And, frankly, you will only make yourself better by playing the ball how and wherever it lies. But, starting off your one round of the month with a ball perfectly centered on the fairway, yet sitting deep down in someone else's divot, can certainly get you off on the wrong foot and ultimately ruin your round from there. So, If you aren't playing against anyone, for money or otherwise, I say, take some free relief and enjoy your round.
8/9/10
 
Scott Shields says:
@ svj ... lol. Thats awesome. The way I see it is this. I play golf, against myself and the course. Part of being against the course is taking what it gives you ... but I'm not going to look down on anyone that wants to pick clean replace, or fluff a lie or do whatever ... its not my game. I don't care. If we're gambling thats different, but for the moment lets assume we're not.
At the end of the day, some people just have a different standard for what they consider fair / right / justfiable, and I'm not going to sit here and tell people how to manage their score cards one way or the other.
8/9/10
 
Scott Shields says:
Although, I do see a complelling argument for the guy that barely gets to get out and play that just wants to have fun and hit a few good shots, and if he paid alot of money, then as long as he isn't slowing down the pace of play ... I say do whatever you want to your ball or lie and remember that golf is supposed to be fun...hurting yourself trying to hit out of a divot, or damaging a club because your ball is 1" away from a tree trunk, and on a root, just might not be worth it to some people.
But if we're gambling .... thats different.
8/9/10
 
mjaber says:
So... if we get to fix "bad luck" does that mean Furyk gets to redo his shot on 16 that hit the flag stick and ended up in the water?
8/9/10
 
tennesseeboy says:
I say play by any rules you like. If you want to tee it up for every shot, go for it. Just acknowledge that you are not playing real golf. Don't enter your score in oob as a normal round. Don't brag about your great score. It kills me when I see "serious" golfers who improve every lie, take a mulligan on every bad shot, and call any putt under 5 feet a giveme. Then they talk about their score like it means something.
8/9/10
 
jev says:
I do agree that you can do whatever you want if you're playing alone, just for fun or training. But... don't make it a rule! I even say: let's strike 25-2 from the rules :D
8/9/10
 
Banker85 says:
mjaber: that was awful, Jim was pissed!

Tenneseboy: My in-laws do that everytime they go out and "golf" if you wanna call it that. I am 10x better than both of them but yet somehow i only beat them by a couple strokes. My father inlaw just hits mulligans until he is happy with the shot and my mother in law forgets a couple strokes a hole and ends up with par some how.
8/9/10
 
falcon50driver says:
Tennessee you hit the nail. Don't brag about your handicap if you're cheating. We know a guy who does that. I played with him in a tournament and kept up with all his shots, 94 of them, He turned in an 84. That word gets out pretty quickly, I'd hate to have that reputation.
8/9/10
 
lcgolfer64 says:
@merlin2 and Banker
Bingo. I play a few times a year with guy that plays like this as well, he somehow always seems to be 'even' or a stroke or two behind me when we play, when in reality, he's shooting in the mid 90's vs mid 80's.
He's not an Oob'r. (did I just start an ethical trend there?...)
8/9/10
 
Banker85 says:
ohhhhh good blog idea. "golf ethics, and people who cheat!"
8/9/10
 
bducharm says:
@lcgolfer64 - as a player, I cannot control what the commitee institutes as part of play. I certainly agree that there are MANY times when we play "lift, clean, and cheat" too often when the Rules of Golf has stipulations for casual water, etc.
8/9/10
 
sierra164 says:
Play the ball as it lies, play the course as you find it, and when in doubt, do what's fair.
8/9/10
 
lcgolfer64 says:
@bducharm - Agree completely with you, as each local course/comittee determines it and the extent to it's use. So hopefully no harm - no foul.
My comment was more an observation to the point of the larger viewpoints around the parameters. It's an interesting discussion today!
8/9/10
 
cjgiant says:
I think most have nailed it - it's all in the point of view. A "serious" golfer who is trying to improve against himself or others, using score or handicap to measure this, should play it as it lies. If enjoying the game non-competitively and score is just a measurement, a golfer should feel free to play how s/he wants; but be honest about it.

However, I also don't feel it has to be all or nothing. There are courses out there that don't take full maintenance seriously, and things like an area of barren ground in the middle of the fairway might not be circled in white. Is this bad luck, similar to being in a divot? I don't quite think so. A similar question may arise with wet bunkers the day after rain (for those of us in areas where "sand" is a term used loosely and you are actually lying in mud).
8/9/10
 
cjgiant says:
Also, I have a slightly different example than being in a divot. Let's say you hit into a bunker where the previous person did not rake the bunker, so you are in a deep foot print. Is this just like any other "bad luck"? Is it a viable option for cheating? Obviously a strict competition dictates the rules, but what about a normal round? Your score is now directly affected by an "opponent" while your other "opponents" will not have the same challenge (assuming you fix the situation by raking the trap properly).
8/9/10
 
Kurt the Knife says:
I have only been learning for a season and a half. I started in the Ncal winter, so lift and clean was the only way or I woulda quit the first day.
After a buncha lessons and getting my spray pattern to narrow to around +/-30 degrees ( only 5-6 balls lost per round ) I found, like it or not, I must play strict book rules or my real progress will never be revealed. In my oob archive I can observe true progress only if there is a rigid standard.
Thats how I'm playin it for now. YMMV.
Good discussion tho'
8/9/10
 
Sparker1969 says:
According to the Rules of Golf there is no such thing as "fairway." You have greens, tees, hazards and "through the green."

Lift, clean and place... BAH!!!
8/9/10
 
Kurt the Knife says:
@cjgiant.
I HATE PEOPLE WHO DON"T RAKE AND FILL BALL MARKS!
I mean, when I first thought about learning to play golf I was enchanted by a romantic notion that courteous,considerate, conscientious ladies and gentlemen plied the green expanses in genial camaraderie. Respecting each other and the fields and greens they walked aware the stewardship they proudly embraced.

pfffftt! O_o

I must say most every player I've met on the course has been friendly and pleasant but the disregard for the conditions like 6-7 untouched green craters PER GREEN, endless expanses of unfilled fairway divots and trampled bunkers I've seen consistently is embarrassing.
*on a personal mission to restore Northern California's pitch marks and divots* lol
8/9/10
 
Swingem says:
Great discussion and comments. I like to stick with "play-it-down" unless winter rules are in effect. This got me to thinking about a situation I faced recently. At a local course that I really like, I found myself in a fairway bunker. To call what filled this bunker "sand" would be laughable, more like dirt and gravel (heavy on the gravel). It seemed to me that to hit out of this s*%t could potentially damage my club, and might not even be safe. What would you do?
8/9/10
 
bkuehn1952 says:
In casual play I tend to follow the idea of "equity". If a real golf committee were in existance, would they have had that bunker declared out-of-play until more sand could be added or repairs made? If your answer is that all the bunkers are rocky messes then you play it as it lays or take an unplayable. If your answer is that the situation is temporary and repairs will be made, then treat the bunker as GUR and drop penalty free.
8/9/10
 
cjgiant says:
@bkuehn1952 -
I agree totally - sometimes the course just isn't in normal condition and not all courses are as diligent about marking their course to reflect it.

@Kurt -
Each person has their own way, but I feel you can measure improvement without having to adhere to the "strict rules of golf". Can you do it on a chart or prove it to others? Maybe not. But I shot in the mid 90s for years, but I knew I was improving b/c I stopped taking mulligans, started playing OB as stroke AND distance, played the ball down (at least 98% of the time ;) ), etc. Could I point to a stat? No, but I knew. Not to say one way is better than the other, just that it's possible.
8/9/10
 
birdieXris says:
@Sparker1969 - fairway is mentioned in the rules of golf as any "closely mown area through the green".
8/9/10
 
svj says:
to be honest, i believe in, playing the ball down. unless the ruling powers note others wise, but i also say its up to the person playing and the course that they are playing at. i played at some places, where bumping the ball really doesnt help at all.. we all don't play on 5 star courses, but if you play at places were you can tell the different between fairway and rough, play it down. it will make you better and u can have that whole hearted feeling, that you were honest and the golf gods will see that and shine down on you someday.
8/9/10
 
Snyper says:
I think some of us are missing the point here. Nobody "plays it as it lies". Everyone marks the ball on the green, cleans their ball, and fixes ball marks. So, throw out the purist, suck it up, golf isn't fair arguement. By that train of thought, you shouldn't take any relief from cart paths, mulched areas, or anything else. Play it as it lies and deal with your bad luck! Obviously, that's crazy. So, if it is ok to get relief from some things and it's ok to lift, clean, and place on the green, why isn't the same true on the fairway? Bunkers etc are all results of bad swings, so....yeah, sorry bout your luck if you get a bad lie. But, a shot in the fairway is a good shot....just like a shot on the green. Same rules should apply.
8/9/10
 
Clint24 says:
I've played in some tournaments that played lift-clean-place rule. For me, I never used it and I really didnt want to use it. It was just one more thing to think about. It feels too much like a scramble, to me, where we all get a club length. I agree with what Matt says, but I also agree with the 150 year old rule book that says "Play it as it lies."
8/9/10
 
Trevor Spring says:
Putting is different you need the ball to roll end over end.
Keep golf for the purists and the rest of you can go bowling with the things in the gutters!!!!
8/10/10
 
Kurt the Knife says:
@giant
precisely what I meant. an objective baseline.
Its working for me as i struggle to make each excursion an appreciation of the construction of the course and my ability to manage it.
Its getting more interesting as I become aware of those elements of "course management" not that I'm in a position to "manage" many constructions... just an appreciation of those who do.
cheers.
8/10/10
 
mdbuschsr says:
I played with a "6 handicap" this weekend. I put it in quotes because he spent an awful lot of time improving his lie. As a twenty handicap, I find it disheartening to play against someone that is better than me and watch them break the rules. There is no doubt that he is better than I am as I watched him take some really nice swings, and the minor improvements he gave himself certainly had little/no impact on his score. I moved my ball only once for the round off from a gravel cart path (I'm just not out there to destroy my clubs). In the end I feel a whole lot better about my 95 than I did his 81. We weren't playing for money or anything so I wasn't too concerned. But like I said it's disheartening to watch a good player improve his lie for no apparent reason.
8/10/10
 
birdieXris says:
@mdbushsr - I'm with you. I play with a lot of "good players" who don't play the ball down. I can't stand it. Normally i don't care if the person is obviously struggling and they've been hitting it in the weeds all day. I'll just say "you can bring it out if you want. Give yourself a shot at it". Normally they do bring it out at least into the normal rough, get a good shot and their mood picks up. The guys that for whatever reason need to compete with me and say they're good are always lying about their scores and rolling the ball in the fairway and sometimes even the rough! some people.. When will they realize you're playign against the course. Rolling your ball in an honest game of golf is like playing hide and seek and counting with your eyes open.
8/10/10
 
Kurt the Knife says:
Seems this subject really struck a nerve.
8/10/10
 
The Full Monty says:
The one thing several people are failing to use in their analogies is logic.

A tree is not a result of man's ignorance. The tree is part of the course and was not created by a golf club hacking into the earth!

I'll play out of a divot, but a plugged drive in the middle of the fairway just doesn't make any sense to me.
8/10/10
 
The Full Monty says:
didn't finish typing

...so there is a rule against it. However, a very similar lie in a divot does not get the same treatment in the rules. It doesn't make sense, but someone once told me that the rules in golf had to be black and white so that there is no room for interpretation.
8/10/10
 
cjgiant says:
To flip this over, how many people have been on the other end of @birdieXris example of being prompted/suggested to improve your lie? I agree with the sentiment for beginners, although I don't know I would make the suggestion to a stranger.

I have had people suggest early in a round that I needn't take a provisional, or I should stop analyzing how to play a bad lie and improve it. Sometimes the person is being friendly/helpful, and sometimes I do start a round a little off. However, occasionally they seem perturbed if I play by the rules. Which is appropriate as I am equally as annoyed at being told, in essence, I SHOULD be cheating.
8/10/10
 
mdbuschsr says:
@cjgiant - that is pretty much what happened to me for my entire round. Anything within a foot and a half was a gimme, and he must have told me three or four times to move my ball. When I finally did move my ball from what I considered an unplayable lie (gravel cart path), I hear... "AAAHHHHH, YOU FINALLY GET IT!!! Take what your partner is 'giving' you." When he asked me my score for the hole, he argued with me about it. See, I took the penalty for the unplayable lie and he wasn't counting it.
8/10/10
 
mdbuschsr says:
I keep thinking about this! Sorry for triple posting!
Maybe I'm wrong but, initially, the game was played by goat/sheep herders in an unmowed field. Virtually EVERYTHING was unplayable, and a divot was the least of their concerns. Then again they weren't pounding the ball out there 250+ yards with a driver. I suspect if they were, we would have a different set of rules all together.
I'm not trying to pick a fight or split hairs, but the game started the way it did and so did the rules. The rules have evolved as technology has forced them to do so. Maybe there is some merit to having a different set of rules for amateurs. I think it's a slippery slope, but just perhaps there is SOME merit.
8/10/10
 
mdbuschsr says:
While I agree to an extent with the OP regarding improving ones lie, there has to be a limit. Until the rules are rewritten, I will continue to take the penalty for moving from an unplayable condition. The problems with trying to write in 'limits' in the rules for this could be unending. I think a start could be... If the ball in play comes to rest against, or in the swing path of, an object that could do damage to the player, or the club the ball may be moved a 'sufficient' distance as to avoid such damage without penalty. For instance I have had two separate occurrences where my drive came to a stop against the exposed root of the same tree 40' off the fairway. My only choices were to break my club, break my wrists & club, or move the ball and incur the penalty. I imagine if I was one of the top players in the world I could flip my club and hit the ball backwards down the fairway to a playable lie... but I'm NOT. If I tried that REALLY cool shot, I still would have broken my club/wrists!
8/10/10
 
mdbuschsr says:
MAN, the 1024 characters (including spaces) make posting a reply difficult!
8/10/10
 
cjgiant says:
@mdbuschsr - you do get free drops from cart paths, one club from nearest complete relief. As far as tree stumps go, in most cases you have some option (even if backwards) to play out, even if no full swing, although an unplayable penalty stroke may be a better option.

I have moved my ball over a foot if it came to rest on or near an embedded rock that I thought would hurt or damage my club. I try not to move to get a better angle (usually backwards) or tee up my shot, but I do take the uncertainty of rock contact out of play.
8/10/10
 
Niramas says:
I totally agree with this article. There is nothing good or honorable in being punished for hitting a great shot. I am sure the same people arguing against it are the same people that don't like instant replay and prefer the "human element". Screw that. Especially when the pros whine like babies if they are not playing on cloud-like fairways. Jeez they even have people tracking their errant shots (and they make more of these then you see on TV, just go to a tournament and see for yourself). How many lost balls have you had that you knew were in play, if only someone was down there spotting for you?

Golf is hard enough without additional random punishment inflicted. If you put it in the fairway you have earned the right to a good lie, unless the course is specifically designed otherwise (links).
8/19/10
 
ot says:
if you improve your lie, how do you keep an accurate handicap?
8/30/10
 
Ace087 says:
Sorry, but this is a load. Why not just tee it up? It's called practice. How many times have you practiced hitting out of a divot. Sometimes good, sometimes bad , If good, all your buddies praise you for an outstanding shot. Also,who determines a bad lie. Is a tight lie, a bad lie,some hate it. My friend calls them "Chile Dip City" Should he be entitled to improve to a lie he can handle?
9/22/10
 
bacination says:
There is some sense in what you say, the fairway should give you a decent lie 90% of the time. However, one of the beautiful things about golf is that you get breaks you dont deserve ... good and bad. Just like life.

If you are playing a course where you can land in the middle of a fairway and, on average, not receive a good lie; then you should do a few things:

1. Look for a better course that is still within your budget.

2. Talk to the pro or groundskeeper and let them know what is happening. They probably already know, see #1.

3. If you must play there, then move your ball until you get a decent lie... but don't let it become a habit. I've seen great players fall into this habit and then it become a compulsion regardless of the lie they have, they must move the ball.

Personally, I dont touch the ball, unless I am playing a practice round or something and the ball is in a HUGE divot in the middle of the fairway.
9/27/10
 
donbull1 says:
If you are going to post a USGA handicap, then play it as it lies. Let's face it high handicap golfers need relief. What ever it takes to pick up pace of play after all, this is a much more important topic. For all you perfectionist out there do you or have you done 26 MPH in a 25 MPH? We are all hypocrites. As for myself, as long as everyone within my group plays everything the same I'm ok.
10/24/10
 
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