"What he was trying to do was to get us on board with them"
By mustang6560 on 10/18/12
According to Alex Miceli, USGA executive director Mike Davis attended the final PGA Tour Policy Board meeting Monday to try and sell its upcoming ban on anchoring.
Davis was here to sell the idea of banning anchoring, an initiative that the R&A and the USGA, golf's governing bodies, are expected to announce soon. With Keegan Bradley (2011 PGA), Webb Simpson (2012 U.S. Open) and Ernie Els (2012 Open Championship) having won major championships with long putters, the anchored stroke has become one of the hottest issues in golf.

Hence, Davis' appearance Monday during the McGladrey Classic at the year's final board meeting.

"What he was trying to do was to get us on board with them," said Paul Goydos, a Policy Board member.
Mr. Davis said the USGA and R&A will issue a joint ruling on the future of long putters and anchoring as a style of putting by the end of the year. And we're already halfway through October so it's no surprise Mr. Davis is hitting the campaign trail.

In Alex Miceli's story, he said Mr. Davis said when if the USGA and R&A decide to ban long putters and anchoring, it wouldn't be because a player gains a competitive advantage.
Davis told the Policy Board that any rule change would not be because of a competitive advantage with the stroke and would be made to address the perception about how the game should be played.
If you don't gain a statistical advantage, then why ban long putters and anchoring?

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[ comments ]
mjaber says:
This is the "groove" rule all over again. If everyone can use it, but some choose not to, there is no competitive advantage.

I've been on the fence about this, going back and forth as to wether I agreed with banning the putters, or the anchored stroke, and at this point, I think they should just leave it alone.
10/18/12
 
birdieXris says:
@mjaber - I 'm with you on the explanation but not the likeness. If everyone can use it, but some choose not to, there is no competitive advantage -- I agree on that one. the groove rule though, was SUPPOSED to protect the golf course- more specifically protect par. Make the game harder for the players. i was for it, even for amateurs. It did change the game, but it seems that it made the game easier for the pros. More spin is hard, less spin is not. I don't see nearly as many balls get sucked off the green as i used to when i watch. Either way--- everyone HAS to use a club with grooves in it. The putter is a different story. Still, i don't think they should take that away from players. If you can use a long putter, then use it. Anchor it. go ahead. It's not like people are attaching hinges to their body, they're just propping it at a point on their sternum or wherever. They should spend more time addressing slow play instead.
10/18/12
 
bducharm says:
@birdieXris said "They should spend more time addressing slow play instead." - AMEN!!!
10/18/12
 
legitimatebeef says:
This issue is threatening to tear us apart. :(
10/18/12
 
joe jones says:
Now I know which asshole is to blame for this piece of stupidity. It,s hard to teach dumb but the USGA and the Royal and Ancient seem to have an abundance. I hope the PGA players fight this. Maybe then common sense will rear it,s head. .
10/18/12
 
mbagnola says:
@birdieXris said "They should spend more time addressing slow play instead." - +1 The governing bodies are entirely out of touch with what the majority of golfers care about. Of all the guys I play golf with, only 5% care about the longer putter debate in anyway. 95% of the golfers I know think that it takes WAY to long to play a round of golf.
10/18/12
 
bkuehn1952 says:
The USGA is essentially a creature of the private country club set. Most of the board members belong to one or more very nice private clubs where there is never any concern about getting tee times, pace of play, course conditions, etc ... As such, their attention tends to be focused on issues of appearance and tradition rather than the gritty problems most of us face - pace of play, cost, lack of access and the difficulty of the game.
10/18/12
 
Dusty23 says:
I can't agree more on the slow play issue, However as far the long putters are concerned, I think they should be banned. You hear all the various experts debate the pros and cons but I would like to see somebody actually ask one of these younger guys why he switched. To say that bracing the putter against you doesn't create an advantage to me is stupid. I compare it to when I was in the service having to fire an M-16, If I had to hold the thing away from my body, yeah I could probably shoot it, But not as accurately as bracing it into my shoulder. Your breathing, steadiness of hands, body sway etc, all contribute to your success or failure and if you are able to negate these things then you have a competitive advantage. Just my opinion.
10/18/12
 
legitimatebeef says:
BUT BUT BUT ITS NOT A COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE IF EVERYONE CAN USE IT!!! Sorry for the mocking tone but I think a lot of people miss the point. Obviously its a gray area in which they're trying to preserve what they consider to be the original spirit of the game. IMO they set a precedent a long time ago when they banned Sam Snead's side saddle or croquet style putting. Because there's nothing inherently against the rules about hitting a putt that way, it's still a ball being "fairly struck" using a simple stick. I am guessing that the powers that be at the time mainly objected to someone especially an icon like Snead, putting in a way that looked ungainly or decidedly un-golf like. Lets face it, shoving a mop handle-looking thing into your gut is nowhere near as cool and graceful as wielding the short stick. Every great player in history has done it that way. At the end of the day it comes down to image, is my sneaking suspicion.
10/18/12
 
Wes11point5 says:
Instead of complaining about long putters and anchoring, the USGA should be doing public outreach about how to properly care for the course......ball marks, bunkers, divots, etc.
10/18/12
 
joe jones says:
Sorry Beef...They never banned side saddle putting just croquet style. Under both styles the club wasn't anchored anywhere. It was banned because BobbyJones (the great traditionlist) thought that it looked unseemly.Not for any other reason. Snead copied both styles from Bob Duden from Oregon. Side saddle is completely legal and can be used on all tours in the world.I have been putting side saddle since 1970 and can hold my own on the greens with almost anyone I have ever played with. Julie Inkster said I was one of the top putters she had ever played with. If anchoring is the only reason they ban long and belly putters side saddle will still be legal. The whole converstion is stupid.
10/18/12
 
GBogey says:
I was originally anti-anchoring as I thought it violated the principle of a golf swing, but after watching a lot of golf during late summer / fedex cup / ryder cup, I'm convinced it's not that big of an advantage. Yes, it helps some people and a few majors have been won, but most of the truly great putters are not using it and there must be a reason why. Quite honestly I think the claw grip looks just as silly, but no one is trying to ban that.
10/19/12
 
Matt McGee says:
Anchoring definitely could be considered a competitive advantage for some. If anchoring makes putting easier for all golfers, but some of them are far better than others with a standard putter, It could be argued that anchoring evens the playing field too much, and that the distinction needs to be made to keep the game competitive.
Think of it this way: Imagine that the PGA decided to allow players to apply WD-40 to the faces of their golf clubs, decreasing ball spin exponentially. Technically, no one golfer would have a competitive advantage over another, but what effect would it have on the game?
10/19/12
 
joe jones says:
Matt McGee. The ball manufacturers would never allow making the face slippery. Just think of all of the slicers that would no longer loose golf balls. My God! Titlest would file to go bankrupt.
10/19/12
 
Matt McGee says:
That's true, Joe, but there would be a whole new list of sponsors for golf tournaments. Imagine - The K-Y Jelly Open, brought to you by Butter!
10/19/12
 
mantajim says:
I know you guys can read, but I'll repeat it again for legitimatebeef ...
ITS NOT A COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE IF EVERYONE CAN USE IT!!!
10/20/12
 
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