Monty Makes a Point
By Torleif Sorenson on 5/28/13
Over the weekend, Martin Dempster of The Scotsman published an interview with Colin Montgomerie regarding last week's ugly episodes over the use of ethnic labels. In that conversation, the longtime European Ryder Cup stalwart and eight-time Order of Merit leader summed up what was on the minds of golf fans all over the world:
"Now we've got the [European Tour] chief executive involved in the whole thing having to say 'sorry'. Christ, we're all frightened to say anything; we're frightened to open our mouths in case we say something that isn't kosher in 2013.

"Somebody should tell us what to say because no one is quite sure what is right and wrong. George says 'coloured', somebody says 'black'. But who is to say who is right and wrong?

"And for the chief executive
[O'Grady], who is a very educated man, to get caught up, we need to decide what we can and can't say and move on quickly."
The first reason this quote is interesting is because in complaining about the use of names, Montgomerie invoked a famous name in violation of the Second Commandment. (If Colin Montgomerie were Helen Keller, we would have to wash his hands out with soap.)

The second reason this is interesting is because Montgomerie makes a valid point about labels such as "black" and "African-American." For instance, sociologists teach in that in nations such as Jamaica, as many as five "racial" or ethnic categories exist, based largely on the appearance and skin color of a person rather than, as the late, great, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. mentioned, the content of one's character.


Michael Campbell, Grant Fuhr, and Delroy Cambridge, excellent golfers all.
None of them are African-Americans.


2005 U.S. Open champion Michael Campbell is not African-American, nor is he "black"; he is a New Zealander of Māori and Scottish descent.

Grant Fuhr, the hockey hall-of-famer, is not African-American; he was born in Spruce Grove, Alberta and is proud of his German ancestry. Fuhr is notable for having nearly obtained his Canadian PGA Tour card while still in the middle of his NHL career, and is a frequent participant at various celebrity golf events across North America. And yet, you will never read about him as being a "German-Canadian" (or even "African-German-Canadian" goaltender. Most people call him exactly what he is: A Hall-of-Famer.

Delroy Cambridge is also not African-American — this experienced teaching professional and senior tour player is a native of Mandeville, Jamaica.

And Tiger Woods doesn't refer to himself as African-American, in part because his mother is Thai and his father's family includes some Cherokee ancestry. When Woods was a kid, he invented the word "Caublinasian" to describe his ethnic ancestry.

To be sure, European Tour chief George O'Grady's use of the word "coloured" was totally regrettable, plainly inaccurate, and long out of fashion. But since the self-appointed political correctness police have become so prevalent that people like Colin Montgomerie feel compelled to speak out, it is a sign of the times.


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[ comments ]
C-4 says:
It is not what you say...it is how the person you say it to perceives what you have said. when a person says somthing you can tell the intent..IE Fuzzy says it was a joke...not hardly.....Sergio lil feelings were hurt and the racist slipped out...although you can tell his racist jokes stay between him and his friends...Ole Georgie boy is just not up to date with his racism..COLORED..that is hillarious
5/28/13
 
joe jones says:
Sergio Garcia, George O'Grady and Colin Montgomerie are well schooled, well traveled men of the world. They have been exposed to just about every form of prejudice over the years,If they don't know by now that certain phrases are off limits it's because they choose not to. Colin in particular should be aware of how words can be hurtful.He was constantly verbally abused by the America golfing public. He should be able to understand the situation and either come out against it or take no position at all. If as he states he doesn't know what is right and wrong he is either showing his ignorance or his racism.
5/28/13
 
C-4 says:
Oh..Sorry..but i would only say that one of the 3 guys above is "Black"....Black is a color not a nationality...duh.. to the eye....most are not ready for this..lets just stick to if a Black person does or wins anything...they will serve fried chicken....if thats the best racist can do...OK
5/28/13
 
jasonfish11 says:
"It is not what you say...it is how the person you say it to perceives what you have said."

So are you saying the offended party is the one who is racist, not the offender?

Since it is about how it is preceived not what is said?
5/28/13
 
birdieXris says:
I think, it a really messed up way, Monty has a point in mentioning that there's no real good way to say anything anymore. No blanket terms, and blanket terms ARE needed i suppose. Not everyone is familiar with the ethnic differences among all different races. Obviously it's preferable to use someone's name but sometimes you just need a descriptive term. I balked when they said Tiger was the only African American on tour -- i was like what? By definition though, it's true. I suppose any descriptive term you come up with is going to eventually turn into racism because someone is going to use it incorrectly or in a racist manner. It's time to move on from this topic and start talking about real golf issues.
5/28/13
 
legitimatebeef says:
At least Montie knows... that as an old upper crusty white guy... he is at high risk of pulling a George O'Grady, anytime he opens his mouth in public.
5/28/13
 
C-4 says:
J- Fish..Yeah..thats exactly what im saying..lol...dont leave out the playing dumb after a act of racism! That is the real getter...you know your a racist..i know your a racist...just say it...i aint mad at you! This is nothing..you should have seen what happen to black youths in the St. Louis Desegrgation program....Everyone needs to stop acting so shocked....how else would the human race survive..without racism??
5/29/13
 
jasonfish11 says:
I've already said that I believe 99%+ of people are racist. I'm not special and therefore do not exclude myself from that group.

The real question is do you?

Here is a little test. If you saw 2 people you dont know anything about either. They are both dressed exactly the same. One is white and one is black. Do you have a different reaction to the 2 of them if they say the "n" word?

If so then your reaction to them is different soley based on their skin color and that is the definition of racism, therefore we can define you as a racist. I can tell you that yes I have a different reaction to those 2 people when I hear them say that word. So I would define myself as a racist.
5/29/13
 
jasonfish11 says:
I did only ask that question because I honestly wasn't sure what you were getting at. I've heard some people make the argument that the offended party is the person with the problem because "words are just words."

Not saying I agree with that concept but I just wasn't clear where you were coming from.
5/29/13
 
C-4 says:
I think that is a bad example. Subtract the "n" word...how about they just say hi...what is you reaction...you can be predjudice based on what society has embedded in your brain without being racist. Everyone has predjudices but not everyone is racist. Thinking all blacks eat fried chicken is a predjudice thought and a stereo type. When derogatory terms or actions follow, thats racism.
5/30/13
 
C-4 says:
"n" word...if your not black, you just cant say it. No rhyme nor reason. I dont carre how cool you are with me. Just like saying "yo mama"..no one other than siblings can say that one either...a guy walks past a lady and she clutches her purse, is that racism...no she is predjudice base on what society tells her..ignorant but not racist. but when she refuses to understand from which this has came and has a problem with all people of the same category..racist
5/30/13
 
jasonfish11 says:
Ok. I guess we just define racism differently. I define it as any prejudice based on skin color. And it sounds like your definition would be any prejudice with mal intent based on skin color. If that is true then its semantics, but then you run the risk of having the argument of "Its not racist it was a joke, not intended to harm anyone."

In your example I'd consider it racist if the woman clutched her purse when a black man walked bye but not when a white man walks bye (or vise versa). Because her actions are different due to the color of the man's skin.
5/30/13
 
C-4 says:
Yep ni ment a black person vs white on the purse thing..at the end of the day you hold your own destiny in your hands. If you let racism bother or consume you its your own fault. Semantics, true. At the end of the day everyone knows when somthing racist is being said or done. i have to look up the definition of racist and predjudice. Well actually the word says it all..RACE-ist..actions base on race or nationality or commonality..my definition
5/30/13
 
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