Why Your Ball Does What It Does
One of the most interesting things about golf ... to me at least ... is the many things a golf ball can do based on a tiny fraction of a second of contact with the clubface. Launch angle, spin, direction, curvature, distance ... all input to the ball in what is actually milliseconds of time on the fact. Pretty darned amazing, actually. And managing those few milliseconds is really what golf is all about, isn't it?

The reason I picked this topic today is that one of our readers, Rory M., sent me a link to an article about the debunking of many of the myths of ball flight control that he had run across. Though he really didn’t ask a question (except to get my take on this study), Rory is winning a new EIDOLON wedge for sharing his "find" with all of us.

The study is an in-depth look into the real physics of ball flight – and a debunking of the long-held belief that the initial direction of the ball is determined by club path, and the final curvature a function of clubface angle. I've never found the old advice –"aim the clubface at the target and align your body with the intended starting line" – to produce the desired shot pattern, and when I first saw this research about ten years ago, it changed the way I tried to shape shots. If you are interested in more, read this. The article draws on in-depth research that Trackman (the launch monitor) published about what really affects ball flight, and it is quite interesting.

In essence, the article shows the starting direction of the ball is much more affected by face angle than swing path, which is just the opposite of what we have always been taught, and what many instructors still teach. I've always believed that to be true, and when I worked over my own shot pattern in my twenties ... to evolve from a low draw to a higher fade, I achieve the result by altering my club path through impact to be more down the line, rather than as much from the inside as I had earlier learned. I think an examination of Hogan’s swing would show that he actually achieved the same thing.

So, with this "new" information, I think curing a shot pattern flaw is made even easier than before. If you are starting the ball on the correct line more often than not, you already are squaring the clubface, so all you have to do is alter your swing path a little more to achieve the curvature you want. And I think that can be done through "mind tricks".

If you have a fade or slice that you want to straighten out, it's obvious your swing path is too much from the outside. My suggestion would be to take some slow practice swings, feeling your right elbow (for RH players) staying a little closer to your side on the downswing. The easiest way to achieve this is to feel more control of the club with your left hand and arm, which will cause more of a pulling motion through impact. See what happens. As you get more comfortable with that move, build up to fuller swing speed and watch your fade/slice be reduced dramatically or disappear completely!

Conversely, if you tend to hook or draw the ball, and want to straighten that out a bit, you can make your swing path more down-the-line by moving a little closer to the ball at address and slowing down your lower body in the downswing. This will allow the shoulders and upper body to keep up and result in a less "from the inside" swing path.

Science is a wonderful thing, and I've always believed that the more we know about the physics of what is happening, the better we can make the ball do what we want. I hope this will prove to be a topic that generates lots of dialog.


photo source
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[ comments ]
goatbarn says:
Can't tell you how many times I've had arguments with people about how wrong the old ball flight laws are. Finally someone puts this information online and explains it simply. Once you understand it, it boggles your mind how you were thinking about it completely backwards for so long. Now some of those punch-hooks from the trees wont hit the tree but actually start right of it and hook around!
7/6/10
 
rmumph1 says:
Thanks Terry for the wedge. Now I can add a gap wedge to the arsenal. I have been wanted to purchase one since I have a 25 yard gap between PW and SW. I think this understanding of ball flight rules has helped my game more than anything. I started playing with a terrible slice and I always though it was my club face staying open (that's what i've been told). I read this article and realized it was my out to in swing path that made the ball turn right at the end. I can now drive straight. I am working on my irons now as I push the ball to the left ( left-handed).
7/6/10
 
eventHorizon says:
ok, wow, I'm going to bite on this one. First, that long article didn't enlighten or make any earth shattering changes into the knowledge of the game. What they emphasized was that its the DIFFERENCE between the angle of the club face and the club path that imparts direction and spin onto the ball. That is physics and that IS the old teaching just described differently. If your club face is closed compared to your path you will put hook spin on ball. Look at their example on the colored trajectory chart. Letter H, inside out swing with square club face angle compared to the clubs path. Letter G, inside out path with a closed club face compared to the clubs path. What is new and amazing about that?
7/6/10
 
rmumph1 says:
Event, old teachings suggested that swing path determined direction of balls path and club face determined spin. That is the exact opposite of what the new ball flight rules suggest. Club face determines direction and swing path determines spin. This may seem like simple physics but for those of us that have been taught all are life to close the clubhead more at impart to get rid of slice ( terrible pull hook to follow) have been taught wrong. Not one person that I talked to about the golf swing ever brought up these ball flight rules. That's the amazing part to me. Now that I know why my ball flight does what it does, I don't have to pay a golf pro to tell me something as simple as quite swinging outside to in.
7/6/10
 
eventHorizon says:
So what type of spin is imparted to the ball with an outside in swing?
7/6/10
 
birdieXris says:
Two things -- First - this isn't anything new. Actually its the 3rd article i've read from TWG that says the same thing only in a different way. Secondly - on going to the page and actually reading the original article how is what Nick Faldo said not true? Aligning your clubface to the target and swinging to the right (or left) to clear the obstacle is effectively the same as the clubface being closed (or open) in relation to the swing plane. I've been hitting draws and fades like this for years without fail (except when i swing wrong of course) and i refuse to believe my "subconscious mind" is correcting the club. It's the same with putting too. As long as your face is square to the target at impact, it doesn't matter how your swing is, the ball will go that direction. IF you plan to work the ball this way, it needs to be said that you should play a little less than you need i.e. if you're going to draw the ball in, make your target a little to the right, fade - to the left.
7/6/10
 
tennesseeboy says:
I'm with birdieXris on this. My best shot on Saturday was an open faced 2 iron around a tree to the green using Nick Faldo's logic. The science may have been wrong but I would rather be on the green with bad science than bouncing off a tree with good science.
7/6/10
 
DiC says:
BirdieXris, are you not making two opposite points?
You say The 'old laws' are right and then say "As long as your face is square to the target at impact, it doesn't matter how your swing is, the ball will go that direction" which is exactly what the 'new' law says, that club face determines original direction.
7/6/10
 
birdieXris says:
Well what i meant and how it was written/read are two different things. That's where it will END not which way it will go. Swing dictates starting direction, face in relation to swing dictates spin. Also i realized that in between the sneaking of writing at work i mistyped about putting. the old way IS the way on the putting green for the most part. If your face is pointed toward the target it will roll that way regardless of swing path with some minor side spin - at least that's what i've found. But thanks for clarifying DiC. :)
7/6/10
 
Bryan K says:
I've found that when I put with an outside-in stroke, my putts tend to fade to the right because of the spin I put on the ball. The opposite is the fatal flaw in my putting stroke. I tend to have an inside out putting stroke, and that causes the ball to hook.

The same is true of all clubs. If the face of the club is square to the target, but you swing outside-in, your ball will slice 100% of the time (if you make solid contact). Even if your clubface is closed, you will slice 100% of the time if your swing path is outside in. When I watch my playing partners swing, I can almost always tell if they are going to hook or slice without knowing how open or closed their clubface is. I stand behind them and watch their swing path. Outside-in means slice. Inside-out means hook. This is the one golf axiom I know to be true 100% of the time.
7/6/10
 
eventHorizon says:
bjohn, so how can I hit the trajectory 'A' or 'I' (from the link) using your axiom?
7/6/10
 
DiC says:
BirdieXris sorry, I'm not trying to catch you out here but again, you are describing these new laws (as they are being called) and saying that the old laws are correct. If you are saying putter square to target regardless of swing path it will go at target and side spin take if off line (face starting direction, swing path relative to that spin) then that is what the new law says. I'm presuming the law says also that this holds true for any club.
To be honest it's like the guy in the video says (link in one of the comments after the article) it's the 'target' line that confuses the whole issue as really that's just an imaginary thing. What's important is difference between club face and swing path that causes the spin. This is the SAME as the old laws isn't it?
Oh, and agreed that this is yet another article on the same thing only using different words.
7/6/10
 
wedgeguy says:
Good dialog, guys. I know that I will touch on the same or similar subjects over the several hundred articles I've written on The Wedge Guy over the past 3 years. There is a pretty large library being compiled here, you know. But I try to keep the subjects fresh. All of you can help by sending in your questions that I HAVEN'T addressed!!! And if I select yours, you win a new EIDOLON wedge. Get to writing!
7/6/10
 
eventHorizon says:
Direct quote from the linked article

"True Ball Flight Laws
One thing is not up for debate and never has been: a ball curves based on the clubface angle at impact relative to the swing path. A closed clubface relative to the swing path always draws/hooks and an open clubface relative to the swing path always fades/slices:

With arrows representing the swing path, the balls in these images will fade/slice, travel straight, or draw/hook from top to bottom.
You can combine these three basic clubface positions with the three basic swing paths:"

Help me out here, what's new about this?
7/6/10
 
iacas says:
If the clubface is closed relative to the swing path, the ball will draw/hook. If it's open relative to the swing path, the ball will fade/slice. That much is agreed upon in both the "old" and the "new" ball flight laws. It's not up for debate.

What is up for debate (if you can call it that - science has pretty much ruled decisively in favor of the "new" ball flight laws) is the STARTING LINE of the golf ball. The "old" ball flight laws said that the ball started on the swing path at impact. The "new/correct" ball flight laws say that the ball starts perpendicular to the clubface angle (or 85% to it - I'm rounding up here).

To illustrate this point, imagine a player wants to play a fade around a tree to a hole directly in line with the tree and the ball. The old ball flight laws say "aim the clubface at the tree/flag, aim your feet left where you want the ball to start, and swing along your foot alignment." That's not right. You'd need to aim the clubface left of the tree and your feet _even_farther_ left.
7/6/10
 
eventHorizon says:
Ok, sorry if I sound like I'm pushing this a bit... well I guess I am pushing it. I'm trying to figure out what is going on here.

So, the old and new 'science' agree that the spin imparted on the ball is a result of the difference between the angle of the clubface and the swing path. The new 'science' differs from the old in that the angle of the clubface relative to the swing path also determines the direction, correct?

If I'm understanding this correctly, forgetting swing path since in the new 'science' it doesn't play a significant role, a swing with a closed clubface at impact first causes a pull and then second causes hook spin (a pull-hook).

Now, how do I hit a pull-fade (trajectory 'A' on the trajectory chart)? If I understand the new science correctly, I would want my face at impact to be closed to create the pull however I also require an open clubface to create cut spin. This shot would apparently be impossible so I must be missing something with this new 'science.'
7/6/10
 
svj says:
wow, my mind is fried... too much for me..
7/6/10
 
rudygu says:
To hit a pull-fade you would aim the face left of target(for a righty), but still open to the swing path. In other words you would aim the face left of target but align your swing even more left.
7/6/10
 
KVSmith59 says:
maybe this will help: www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wnq6TiXw7wU&feature=play
7/7/10
 
stedar says:
Tried it - found that I was over thinking. Game has gone. Need to go back to basics:

Seems to me, understanding that it is milliseconds that makes all of the difference, all of the prep is what is important. Stance, Alignment, focus and Positive Mental Attitude. The things I can see and control; the millisecond at impact I can't even see.
All the science is great, but getting the score down if even greater.
Practice, practice and more practice - all of the basics and forget about trying to hit the ball.
My 2 cents worth ;-)
7/7/10
 
BigDoctorJ says:
+++REP to stedar and svj. Exactly what I was thinking. I think if you have a swing problem, record yourself, your worst critic is yourself so analyze your swing and compare to the pro you wish to emulate. my 2 cents
7/7/10
 
DiC says:
Agreed stedar... I am not suggesting that I am thinking about the physics at the exact millisecond I hit the ball but being able to know what it happening in that millisecond by seeing what the ball subsequently does in flight (that's assuming it's one of the shots that I actually get airborne!) is hugely useful information. It gives me the indication of what I need to do different at address in order to return the club on the right line at the right angle to change it.

To be honest I'd be happy with straight and straight going straight at the hole!
7/7/10
 
eventHorizon says:
Rudygu, what you describe as a pull-fade is dependent on your swing path creating the initial 'pull' direction whiich is the old science. There must be another way not dependent on swing path.
7/7/10
 
Bryan K says:
Okay, I haven't read the article because it's nothing new for me. However, the answer to the question on how to hit a pull-fade is easy. Close your club face in relation to the target line (to get the pull) and hit an outside-in swing plane (to get the fade). However, instead of trying to pull the ball, I would allign myself to the left of the target directly where I wanted the ball's flight-path to start, try to hit the ball straight by squaring the club to the target line, and use an outside-in swing path to simply cause a fade.
7/7/10
 
DiC says:
bjohn13 according to the article and these super-dooper rules (which is what I'm going to start calling them as they seem to suggest that they are pretty 'definitive and not to be argued with'!) that set up you just described would give you a slice/fade that started on the target line and then faded away from it.

Face alignment - starting direction (towards target).
Swing Path relative to face alignment - spin causing fade.

no pull about it.
7/7/10
 
DiC says:
sorry bjohn13.... just read your post through again and I just repeated what you said.. I'll go back to sleep!
7/7/10
 
DiC says:
hold on... no I was right the first time.

You said "I would allign myself to the left of the target directly where I wanted the ball's flight-path to start" but the super-dooper laws disagree. The ball would start at the target regardless of where you are aligning as that is the way your club face is pointing.

(I'm confusing myself now!)
7/7/10
 
eventHorizon says:
Okay I think I'm getting it. Pull-fade:

Swing path - 3 degrees outside in
Clubface - 2 degrees closed

Results:
Initial direction - 2 degree pull as a result of the clubface angle
Spin - slice spin as a result of the clubface angle being 1 degree open relative to swing path

Correct? Sorry guys.
7/7/10
 
DiC says:
correct eventHorizon.
7/7/10
 
eventHorizon says:
Old school way, the way I was trained, fade:

Swing path - square
Aim - 2 degrees left of target
Clubface - 2 degrees open relative to where I'm aimed, square to target

Results:
Old expectations:
Initial direction - 2 degree left of target
Spin - slice spin toward target

New expectations
Initial direction - towards target
Spin - slice spin moving farther from target as a result of clubface angle open relative to swing path
7/7/10
 
brianshaffer32 says:
iacas has it dead on with: "To illustrate this point, imagine a player wants to play a fade around a tree to a hole directly in line with the tree and the ball. The old ball flight laws say "aim the clubface at the tree/flag, aim your feet left where you want the ball to start, and swing along your foot alignment." That's not right. You'd need to aim the clubface left of the tree and your feet _even_farther_ left."
7/7/10
 
brianshaffer32 says:
Remember a Fade is a shot that moves from left to right. The "left" implies the ball starts going left (Determined by the Club Face)and then spins to the Right (determined by the Swing Path) If you want the ball to initially start left of the target and then move directly at the target then you would have (for example) 2* of a closed clubface and then 2* of an out to in swing. A Pull Slice would be a result of (for Example) 2* closed club face at impact with an out to in swing path of more than 3* or more...
7/7/10
 
eventHorizon says:
Brian, spin comes from clubface angle relative to swingpath... So your example of 2* closed clubface with 2* outside in swing path would be a dead straight 2* pull. Correct?
7/7/10
 
rudygu says:
yes, eventHorizon, sounds like you've got it nailed now.
7/7/10
 
brianshaffer32 says:
... I interpret Clubface angle relative to swingpath as the following (which with out a doubt could be beyond wrong): If your Clubface is 2* closed at impact then you will be 2 degrees left of the target if your swing path was 2 degrees closed relative to the actual target. To create spin back towards the target one most have a swingpath that is 2* Out to in Relative to the CLUBFACE (not the target) at impact ( I am unaware of what the ration would be in terms of ClubFace Degrees open relative to Degrees in which the swingpath was out to in of the actual target, So I do it from moment of impact.) Then again what do I really know haha but the effort is there!!! Put Me in Coach...
7/7/10
 
bplewis24 says:
For those of you who are questioning how these "new" ballfight laws are different from the old ball flight laws, please watch this video which illustrates it:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wnq6TiXw7wU

Pay special attention to what he starts describing at the 7 minute mark, and specifically what he asks at the 7:40 mark. At the 7:40 mark, he differentiates between a correction that the "old" ball flight laws would dictate and what the new ball flight laws actually prove to be true.

Brandon
7/7/10
 
mjaber says:
Hit ball... find ball... repeat until it is in the hole... move on to next hole.

I'm happy when the ball goes forward and in the general direction I'm aiming.
7/7/10
 
Bryan K says:
DiC: I actually discribed two different setups in the post you are questioning. The first setup was what I would do to actually accomplish the pull-fade. Allign myself at the target, close my clubface, and swing outside-in. However, I believe in keeping things simple. Plus, club face angle also affects trajectory which is what I actually prefer to use my club face angle to manipulate, but that's an entirely different article altogether. Therefore, my preferred method for shaping this shot would be to allign myself square to where I want the ball flight to begin, make sure my club face angle is square to that point, and then swing outside-in to create the fade. This ends up creating a straight-fade, which is actually a shot that I manipluate quite well (as opposed to the straight-hook which tends to not hook).
7/7/10
 
eventHorizon says:
This is absolutely different than the way I've been thinking about moving the ball for 20 years but honestly it makes sense. My game is unfortunately in shambles right now and I'm sure this will only break it up into a hundred more pieces but I'm going to try it. Now I'll have to get an idea of what it takes to get a certain amount of spin.
7/7/10
 
Swingem says:
Holy Headscratcher! Great discussion, hope ya'll can still break 100 after this :)
7/7/10
 
rudygu says:
If anything, it's made the game simpler for me. Now I know for certain what my clubface was doing at impact simply by watching the ballflight. Before, I thought I knew, but since I was basing it on incorrect assumptions my swing fixes rarely worked.

For example: I would hit a pull slice that started left of target and ended well right. I would assume my clubface was pointing right of target at impact, but now I know it was an over the top swing with the face aimed left of target at impact. Now I can correctly work on swing path, not trying to forcibly close the face at impact.
7/7/10
 
Bryan K says:
rudygu: As I'm sure you know, there are a million other things that can go wrong with a golf swing. I'm convinced that tempo is 90% of what makes a good golf swing. If I push the ball, it's usually because my tempo is too fast (not releasing soon enough). If I pull it, it's usually because my tempo is too slow (releasing too quickly). Obviously, the point of release will have a lot to do with how open or closed the clubface is at contact.
7/7/10
 
DiC says:
bjohn13... makes sense. I must have mis-read before!
This subject fascinates me as it obviously all happens too fast for anyone to consciously adjust mid swing but as I said before knowing what must have been going on at that moment of impact by observing the ball flight is massively important. Now if only I was a good enough player to use that information to hit par!!
7/7/10
 
windowsurfer says:
Read this thread yesterday and had miserable evening off the tee afterwards. A case of Plimpton's Japanese Admirals. I am reminded of GD article arguing that concentrating on precise mechanical actions ("swing inside out, close clubface") were less effective, even damaging, compared to more generalized thoughts ("swing out towards first base"). Also agree that the right tempo cures many ills.
7/7/10
 
rudygu says:
bjohn13: I agree that tempo is very important. That's not at all contradictory to what I was saying. My point is that before I understood why the ball curves the way it does I was fighting a losing battle - closing my club face to try and stop my slice. All that accomplished was turning my slice into a pull hook which in turn caused me to subconsciously hold the face open in an effort to stop the hook. From there the cycle would start all over again.

Now, armed with the correct information, I know exactly how to align myself to produce any given ballflight and by extension I can intelligently attempt to fix any problem I might have.
7/7/10
 
svj says:
KVSmith59, thank god for your link.
7/7/10
 
KVSmith59 says:
lol. I have a hard enough time hitting it straight let alone trying all this out. Out of curiosity, I looked at everyone who posted above me. 6 of you are below 10 handicap, 3 of you have no scores posted at all, and 9 of you (including me) have handicaps above 12. This is good information to know, but for the 9 of us that are above 12 handicap, I think all it will do is cause you problems. IMHO the 9 should be worrying about more serious problems with our swings than shaping the ball. LOL. Give me the grief now :)
7/7/10
 
Bryan K says:
KVSmith: I'm not going to give you grief; however, I will say that this information is more important to the high cappers like you and I than it is to the low cappers. Why? Because most high cappers have something wrong with their swing, be it a push, pull, hook, slice, or what-have-you. This information is absolutely crucial to helping us fix those problems, and if we learn how and why we fix our problems as we go, we glean valuable information that will help us in the future.

I'm not a great shot-shaper, but I have learned a thing or two about it over the last summer and a half. I started by having to fix a nasty hook. After a while, what I did to correct that evolved into a nasty slice. Over the past week, I have used this information to adapt my swing to fix the slice. Now I know what causes the hook, and I know what causes the slice. As I get more and more confident with my swing, I can start to use that information.
7/7/10
 
Bryan K says:
rudygu: Just wanted to make sure. I just started working on tempo recently, and it has been a big help. Before that, I used to have so many instances where I could have sworn my club face was square only to end up with a nasty push or pull.
7/7/10
 
eventHorizon says:
The youtube link was great, it helped a lot to see the different angles. Thanks KVSmith59. Single digit handicap or not, I'm guessing the majority of us, if not all of us, can't hit the ball consistent enough to purely test the theory. Instead, the outcome is a matter of confidence in our head that we will execute the shot we want to hit. If we have a mechanism we feel comfortable with to hit the shot then our confidence will be improved.

Honestly, I absolutely do not use any shot that requires adjusting your swing path to shape a shot during a round. There are so many possibilities of error in my swing that trying to make a change for one particular shot just adds a whole new multitude of possible problems. My push to understand this article was purely to have a better grasp at what is going on fundamentally.

Find what works for you, be confident in your swing, imagine the shot you want to hit, and go for it.
7/7/10
 
svj says:
i agree with bjohn, that is priceless information. i played for almost 17 years and never learned the flight rule in that degree. i mean, i wouldn't go out there and be like reggie jackson and calling my shots on every tee and say i'm going to fly it over the bunker on the right and hit the left lip of it from 270 out with my push-draw,lol. but i do believe it will give anyone more feed back.
it's the 80 percent why and 20 percent how rule...
7/7/10
 
KVSmith59 says:
Oh, I agree it's great info. There are always shots out there where the ability to shape the ball around a tree would be great, but 9 times out of 10 unless you are a low handicapper, your attempt at shaping the shot is going to turn out worse than simply trying to punch it back out into the fairway or shooting for an unprotected part of the green. I firmly believe that most high handicappers have a big enough problem hitting it squarely let alone trying to hit an inside outside or outside inside shot with a 5 degree closed or open face. My theory is that once you get the fundementals down, then you start tweaking your shots. I also believe that in most cases, the high handicapper's biggest problem is not what happens enroute to the green, but on the green..i.e. putting. If you're putting average is more than 36 putts per round, that's where you need to put most of your practice.
7/7/10
 
svj says:
o yea, putting is it for sure. but what im saying is that it doesn't have to be about shot shaping. in the video, there was 3 ways to hit the ball straight to the target, that was 2 more than i knew of. the fundementals, by far are the most valued in this all, but if you get them down. why not focus on the last thing you can consciously think about?? the start of the swing, outside, inside, straight back and for most part you can even think about through path. i can't control if im squared at the top or if my hips fire to early, but i can control a small part, like face angle and swing path to a degree. it might be an overload to think about while playing, but i think, it will be amazing for the range...
7/7/10
 
stedar says:
There is one truth in knowledge (new found, or learnt over years of getting it wrong) confidence comes from understanding. Why the ball does what it does and how "we" create the cause and effect of ball flight is very enlightening.
What really gets me is the inconsistency. Even in a round where a couple of pars in a row make you feel like you've got it nailed, then a double bogey out of nowhere brings you back to reality.
As it has been mentioned so many times in previous posts: PMA coupled with practice = improvement.

BTW - Love this site. It's great having so many like minded people all trying to improve and passing little bits of info.

Bring on the Sun and let me play...
7/8/10
 
KVSmith59 says:
oh I get it. I watched that video several times and studied the chart. I have a better understanding of what happens when you hit a ball, and I'll be experimenting on the driving range here and there, but after I get rid of my swing woes (have a problem with swaying).
7/8/10
 
DiC says:
Does anyone have the adjusted chart where it accounts for hitting into a swirling gale force wind??

I think I managed to get ball flights b, g and i last night - all on one shot!
7/8/10
 
Bryan K says:
lol DiC.
7/8/10
 
Tim Horan says:
Cannot hold with this new stuff! The old thinking works for me...swingpath dictating initial ball direction...face open/shut imparting spin to bring the ball back to intended target. Everything else is "smoke and mirrors" Who needs the quantitive, physics and scientific explanations? you surely aren't going to get out a slide rule each time you get stymied behind a tree. Keep it simple guys! If it ain't working for you you are doing it wrong.
7/9/10
 
Bryan K says:
It is simple, Tim. Extremely simple. Because it works.

What you say reminds me of the old fogeys I used to run into at the poker table all the time. They'd say stuff like "who needs pot odds. I've been doing it this way for years, and it works for me." At the end of the night, I'd almost always have their money.
7/9/10
 
rmumph1 says:
I started this topic, so I wanted to be the last to write about it and I don't like odd numbers( except for 5 & 7), so comments will be at 60 now. That's it.
7/9/10
 
onedollarwed says:
Wait...

Fantastic post, and it's true that the "old way" can work for you - but with limitations! It's like a field goal kick which somebody shanks and goes straight through. It get's right through the target, but not why you think it does. Like "true alignment" when aiming off line... in golf it's hard for us to adjust one thing at a time, and then not have the mind/body readjust somehow. So for instance, how often do you change your ball position to create horizontal shaping? Most of life is illusion? Why do you keep your job? income? Is it smart investing? skills? Even if you think you are a wiley entrepenuer, you're still largely supported by government spending, or general market forces that have nothing to do with you - atribution theory!
7/10/10
 
onedollarwed says:
We need to review terms:
If you have a completely straight alignment and swing straight through the ball with a completely square face, that is a straight shot (in a vacuum).
If with the same exact alignment you swing from the inside to the outside (changing the swing path only, right english say), the ball will start straight and then curve left.
The "old law" says it should've started right and the curved back center.
If you're using the old law - especially for many years with success, you've have to have re-aligned to the right, or opened the clubface - probably by getting it back in the stance a little or by some other manipulation.
I know from experience that I can work a ball quite well without any conscious though - just set up and swing - like in ping pong. However, when the time comes to really think it through to get it right under pressure - there is only one way it can really make sense.
7/10/10
 
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