Why Can't We Play Golf Faster?
The pace of play was very much in the news the past couple of weeks, and it’s a topic that gets lots of dialog, but little action to change things. The time it takes to play a round of golf has steadily increased for decades. What used to be a 3 to 3-1/2 hour entertainment has turned into 5 hours in way too many cases.

On the professional tours recently, Kevin Na’s false starts and endless waggles drew lots of attention and criticism, but no penalty at all. On the LPGA, however Morgan Pressel’s seemingly one-time delay cost her a loss of hole, which was followed by loss of focus, and loss of match. The PGA Tour hasn’t penalized a stroke for pace of play in 17 years! Which was right?

To me, the pace of play problem all started with the professional tours, and then that snail-like approach to playing a round of golf crept across the game to contaminate the entire spectrum of recreational golf. I say it starts on the tours, because that is the most visible example to us all of how the game should be played. We watch, unwittingly learn and copy all too often.

We all know it’s an issue, so why can’t something be done? I hear all arguments, one even being that “I’ve paid to spend my afternoon on the golf course; I’m in no hurry to see it end.” Valid, but if you want to spend 5 hours out there, why not play 27 holes and have even more fun? How about if the entire fee structure for golf changed from a green fee for 18 holes to a green fee for an allotted time? If you buy 4 hours and can’t finish the round, tough . . . your time is up and you have to leave the course.

Better yet, what if they did that on the pro tours? The first starting time in the morning has 3-1/2 hours to finish their round. If they don’t . . . DQ. Sheesh, they play threesomes with caddies, for Pete’s sake. We play four and fivesomes, shooting 75 to 85, lots of bets on the line and never take more than four hours at our club. We have a walking group on Wednesday afternoons, 4-5 of us over 50 years old, carrying our own bags and playing for money, and never take anywhere close to 2 hours for our nine holes.

You can play fast without hurrying. There’s a big difference. Being ready when it’s your turn to play. Looking over your putt while others are putting. Lining up the putt from only behind the ball, instead of stalking it from all sides.

It’s said that cost, time and difficulty are the three things that make people leave the game. It would seem to me the time thing would be the easiest to fix . . . if we/they really wanted to do that.
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[ comments ]
clevelandstever says:
Ready golf. Far too few people play it. All the time I watch groups all go to the first ball, hit it, then the second, hit it and so on. It drives me crazy. The biggest culprit is the golf cart. It does not speed up play. If you carry you naturally walk to your ball and play it, but in the cart guys don't want to leave their partner behind, so you both drive to one ball, and then both to the other. If it is a 90 degree rule or cart path only, forget it, the round will take 2 weeks.
5/22/12
 
mjaber says:
There are 2 things that can be done to speed up play.

1. Better rangers, and strict adherance to pace. One local course I play has the time it should take to play listed on the scorecard, and the time through each hole. The rangers know when you teed off, and make sure you are maintaining the pace. If you are behind, they will ask you to speed up. If they have to ask again, you will be asked to skip a hole to get back in position. 3rd time is the last. If you don't keep up, you are asked to leave.

2. Make the greens fee good for as long as you are there. A different course has 2 18-hole courses. You can pay the greens fee once, and play all 36, or the same 18 twice, or whatever you want. The only thing you have to pay for to play another round on the same day is the cart fee.
5/22/12
 
Scott Shields says:
I think you could have people place a 'deposit' at check-in, that would be some amount over the cost for the 18-holes at some established pace. When they come in, depending on how long over or under that 'pace' they are, they either get money back. For example, if an 18 hole round is 45 dollars, collect 60 from each man, and assume the pace is 4:15. Use a 15 min = 5 dollar number or something, so if they come in at 4:00 they get 20 back, if they come in at 4:30, they only get 10 back ... and so on. This would motivate people to play quicker, and also to be more pro-active about playing through, calling the club house to ask the marshalls to help out ... and so on.
5/22/12
 
legitimatebeef says:
Clevelandstever hits on a major problem. The attached-at-the-hip mentality. It's kind of cute I guess if a pair of dudes feels such a intimacy with each other that they don't feel comfortable leaving each other's side (personally I don't swing that way but to each his own) however it is horrible for the pace of play. Especially when they are bad golfers. And like mjaber says enforcement is really the only way to mitigate this problem. You cannot expect ordinary ppl to understand the big picture--the average person in this day and age is simply too selfish and small-minded.
5/22/12
 
blundermuz says:
Play Stableford at ALL times, not sure why there is an obsession with Ameteurs wanting to play stableford.
5/22/12
 
larrynjr says:
Friends and I played 2 courses in one day last month. We walked the first 18 and finished almost exactly 4 hours. We used carts on the second shorter, easier course and took about 5.5 hours.....carts are not faster!
5/22/12
 
birdieXris says:
I played Allentown Muni last week... 6 and 1/2 hours. There was a scramble on the course in front of us.. how in the world does a format like scramble take longer to play than normal golf? Pick the best shot, ride to your ball, pick it up and play from the best shot. It doesn't take that long. we were a 3 some, walking, one of us was like 70 years old so it's not like we were jogging around the course... we still waited for at least 10 minutes on every single hole. amazing.
5/22/12
 
larrynjr says:
One course I play is obsessed with pace of play and has signs all over saying how much time you should be at per hole. They show it at 15 min. per hole but if you are playing slower than 10 min. per hole, people are hitting their drives into your group. There is a fine line between slow play and too fast. I try to play ready golf but I hate to feel pushed and rushed through my round. Spoils the whole day.
5/22/12
 
jkyleolson says:
I'm a huge fan of Ready-ish golf. A mix between regular and ready golf. If two balls are next to each other then who ever is ready first goes first but if two balls are no where near and ones in the way of the other then play conventional pace.
5/22/12
 
Banker85 says:
i can play 18 holes with a cart by myself in about 2 hours. walking 3. I have always played ready golf and cant stand it when people are worried about other things except for the game we are playing. The only time i dont care is during a scramble and the whole course is basically being used for the scramble so i will take my time and not worry so much about pace.
5/22/12
 
SD Charlie says:
The absolute worst is when some folks stalk their putt from all over the green, take several practice strokes and then can't place the putt within 5 feet of the hole. It would drive me insane if I got that bad a result after all that time invested. Slow play is rampant in San Diego. I love spending time playing golf, but time spent waiting on a tee box is not golf, it's the DMV.
5/22/12
 
clevelandstever says:
You can play faster in a cart by yourself because a cart goes faster than you walk. But you have a foursome in two carts, and they are average to below average golfers they will take 6 hours to play. If one guy in the cart shanks his shot into the woods on the right, and the other guy pulls it to the left side rough, they will BOTH ride to go find the ball in the woods. He will play it forward (not very far) and they will BOTH ride to the ball on the left to play it, etc. God forbid someone walk a couple feet on the golf course. Carts speed up play if you have low handicappers who are playing cart golf, but give a group of average duffers a cart, and they take forever. Myself included, which is why I prefer to walk. A lot of times when I play a course that requires the cart, I find myself grabbing half my bag and carrying the clubs rather than ride around in circles with my partner the whole round.
5/22/12
 
dottomm says:
When I play with more 'recreational golfers' I find I'm always suggesting they just pick up the ball after 8 strokes. "Come on. You really want to write down an 11 or 14? Pick the damm ball up and lets try again on the next tee! "
5/22/12
 
GolfSmith7 says:
I once played alone on a cart 36 holes and lapped a foursome that let me play thru on the first 6th hole I caught up to them on whole 17 that is ridicules.
5/22/12
 
joe jones says:
Living in a 55 & over community our courses are filled with women, 60s, 70s, & some 80 year olds. Most have their own carts and it is very rare for an average round to exceed 4 to 4 1/2 hours. Ready golf is the rule. Most players park carts between 2 shots and walk to the ball. They know what club they are going to hit because gps units or lasers are used. Putting may be a little slower because older nerves come into play but they make up for it by reading putts in advance where possible. If I play alone I can play one of our executive courses in 2 to 2 1/2 hours. Full course in 3 to 3 1/2 hours. Wasting time between shots causes much of the slow play. A little education goes a long way. A strong ranger program helps a lot more.
5/22/12
 
DaRupp13 says:
I wrote this in an earlier post regarding fast play. I find the biggest culprit is similar to people not playing ready golf. It's perfectly OK to hit the balls in order from distance away from the pin IF - when it is your turn, you are READY TO HIT YOUR SHOT. However, since most people don't follow this, and will start to line up their shot or putt once it's their turn, I turn to ready golf as a remedy. Lining up your shot, checking wind, club selection are all silent, do it while someone else is hitting their shot and the be ready to hit when it's you're turn.
5/22/12
 
BME_Badger says:
Get rid of carts or go to single cart systems. Rec golfers aren't good enough to take advantage of cart golf and actually play slower.

With regards to ready golf, my biggest concern is safety. I'm much more likely to play ready golf and be ready to hit my ball if I know I'm playing with someone competent who won't drill me if I'm on the other side of the fairway and in front of them. Otherwise - I'm staying behind and waiting until everyone is clear to get to my ball. I've been hit at least a couple of times on what you would think were impossible angles.

Another thing that would help would be better marked yardages. Our league wastes tons of time with people trying to find yardages because courses are so poorly marked and not everyone has rangefinders or GPS units.
5/22/12
 
OCGolf says:
While the classic stereotypes ring true to some degree (old folks and women taking longer to play), by far the worst offenders are 30-50 year old, all-male foursomes who play like they're on tour and blatantly avoid any semblance of 'ready golf'.
Seems like every weekend the bottleneck is around 'that group' of 4 guys:
Nothing like waiting while three of the four take the time to GPS or laser their approach shots despite being 12 feet or so from the 150 marker stick, and within 5-10 yards of each other, followed by the hesitation and mid-practice swing club change decisions.....
.... all picking up and marking balls despite being on opposite ends of the green, no where near each other; each waiting for the other to putt before putting the ball down and aligning the putting line on their balls, then eyeing up the break. Holing out is followed by the hunt to pick up wedges scattered around the fringe, all followed by the classic 'conference beside the green' marking scores.
5/22/12
 
Agustin says:
I don't believe in Ready-golf as the solution to speed up play. It takes away the accontability from the player that should be next. Slow players simply thing that if someone want to hit before them they can and actually take longer. When we're in a hurry we adhere to the right order so whoever is away is next. This makes them hurry since we're all waiting for them.
5/22/12
 
DaRupp13 says:
@Agustin the problem most of us see is that pressure on them to hurry doesn't actually make them hurry. They take their time, except now everyone in waiting instead of taking care of their own shots.

But to Agustin's point, ready golf isn't the answer to the core issue, it's a bandaid, a quick fix, to solving the issue of taking too long. The heart of the issue is people not knowing how to play golf (I don't mean talent to hit the shots, I mean as an activity). But good luck teaching everyone the latter...easy to teach that to one person, but to every golf will never happen. Until then, I'll play ready golf.
5/22/12
 
woobwoob says:
There is merit to looking at your putt from different angles before you hit, but I do agree with playing ready golf.
5/22/12
 
GBogey says:
My peeve is the amount of time some players take around the greens. I mean, if the pro's are only hitting 2% of 30 ft putts, what makes the weekend player think that spending all that time looking at it is going to help the putt go in.

Now that that is off my chest, any thoughts on how to speed up slow players in your group politely. I was in the slow foursome last weekend, took 4.5 hours and really should have taken 4 hours or less based on what was in front of us. Two of the guys I was paired with just weren't ready when they should have been and were very slow to get into position. I felt the need to say something but I also knew I was stuck with them for the round. Any suggestions out there?
5/22/12
 
accarson3 says:
Our regular group plays a modified version of ready golf...esp around the greens - if 3 are on the surface and one is skulling a chip from one side to the other, we don't wait on that person to get set...we just putt out while the 4th walks around the green to retrieve his errant shot. Same holds true when one (or more) are looking for lost balls near the fairway. Otherwise we follow the order of play. So it's not us causing the slow play, it's those idiots in front of us!
5/22/12
 
Stymie says:
"ready-golf" is not the answer it should be "golf-ready". Read your put while the other is reading theirs, Get out of the cart, grab a couple of clubs, and WALK to your ball. Hit your ball and then help the others find the ball in the woods. I like the idea on not marking the balls on the green if you are not in the way of others. All of this only saves 5 or 6 seconds but 5 or 6 second by foursome a couple of times a hole and for 18 holes can start to add up.

5 seconds saved X 2 twice a hole X 4 players X 18 holes = 12 Minutes
5/22/12
 
menevets says:
You can teach everyone all the techniques, hire rangers, put up pace of play signs, etc..., but pace of play won't change until you change people's ATTITUDES, until they themselves want to play faster. If you've played in the UK, for the most part, you'll notice players make a concerted effort keep pace, let faster players through. Total oppositie in the US. People take their sweet time.

My pet theory. Slow players... They're the ones who honk you .001 seconds after the light turns green.

And 5 hours? In NYC, LA, big cities, typically 6 hours on a weekend on a muni course.
5/22/12
 
Duke of Hazards says:
the dudes that stay in their cart while their buddy (who takes 8 practice strokes and then chunks the ball up 30 yards) hits irritate me the most. as someone earlier said, it's the middle aged male foursome in 2 carts that are the worst offenders. i've never been stuck behind a group that was walking.
5/22/12
 
BAKE_DAWG40 says:
I played with my father a month ago. We ended up behind a threesome at the turn. They were so agonizingly slow, we stopped after we holed out on 15 and headed to the club house. I can't play golf like that.
5/22/12
 
BAKE_DAWG40 says:
Oh, the other thing that grates on me is someone telling me I'm next to play when my ball is on the fringe 15 ' from the pin & they have a 60' putt. Whatever.
5/22/12
 
legitimatebeef says:
Gbogey: It's easy, just deflect. I will usually point at the group ahead and say "Hey guys I know it sucks to rush but we really need to keep pace with that group up there, and they are X holes ahead of us by now. It's a course policy." That way it conveys a sense of the big picture, rather than the idea that it is me who is getting annoyed with the slow play.
5/22/12
 
joe jones says:
Age has nothing to do with pace of play. Too much testosterone comes into play. 30 to 50 ish golfers think they are on tour. They can be playing for a dime skin and worry and fret over every shot. Get to your setup,take the shot and guess what. One of two things will happen. It will be a good shot or a bad shot. 50-50 odds are better than Las Vegas. Hit the damn ball and then go find it!
5/22/12
 
SniderS says:
Really??? Why is everyone in such a hurry? Our society has created a "hurry go here, hurry go there" attitude. People drive like crap because where they are going is more important than what you're doing. There's not consideration for your fellow man. We're all headed for the grave, so take a moment and relax for God's sake. Ever here the term, "Stop and smell the roses"? I for one am always sorry that the game is over so even though I keep a good pace, I try to enjoy my current environment. People, people, people, take a freaking breath and knock it off with the "hurry up" crap. Enjoy something once and a while...
5/22/12
 
legitimatebeef says:
Four hours is plenty long time to smell roses, any longer than that and it just starts to drag.
5/22/12
 
elhacker says:
I agree with SniderS. With that being said, if I take 6 hours to play golf my wife is gonna kick me in the nuts.
5/22/12
 
mlf16507 says:
As Gene Sarazen used to say--Miss 'em quick!
5/22/12
 
Werepuppie says:
As Trevino said all you do when thinking over a putt,is think up ways to miss it.
5/22/12
 
elhacker says:
Well I take back what I originally said. Pace of play is important because of tempo. Golf is a sport that requires steady, repeated tempo. When pace of play is slowed where you're waiting 10 minutes a hole to tee off tempo and rhythm are difficult to repeat. When you get angry because of slow play you lose concentration. One problem I see in my Thursday league is guys who think they're Tiger, and when pace of play slows they get angry because their game is somehow affected by it. In reality they stink just as bad as me.
5/23/12
 
GBogey says:
I sometimes wonder if all of the advice for to establish a pre-shot routine is part of what is slowing down both pro's and amateurs. Some are obviously confusing the advice for a routine with thinking that they need a long routine to be effective. I saw a golf channel segment where Annika showed her routine and it is consistently 19 seconds. I think longer routines actually hurt most players, especially higher handicaps.
5/23/12
 
DaRupp13 says:
SniderS, are you really comparing aggressive driving with playing timely golf? If you want to talk a nice slow walk, go to a park. There are established times for what a round of golf should take, keep to it. If you want to do it slower, go take a 6,500 yard walk somewhere else. elhacker made a good point, slow play really throws off tempo when you're waiting on every tee for 10 minutes.
5/23/12
 
dougbenefield66 says:
This is what I love about golfing in NE Alabama. I am a teacher and get to play after school during Spring and Fall and on weekdays during the summer. There is hardly anyone on the course. There are tons of courses up here compared to the amount of people who play....the economy only makes the crowds even better!!
5/23/12
 
dougbenefield66 says:
As a counterpoint though....there is nothing worse than rushing through a round of golf. I understand we shouldn't screw around and take hours....but when it's crowded and you have take a brisk walk/spring to every shot and not be even able to enjoy a cold beer...really stinks.
5/23/12
 
Beekeeper45 says:
Just got on here and have read only a few posts, so here goes. This morning I played with a foursome to get ready for league play next week, the oldest in our group was 93 yep 93 and still fairly fit, and myself being the youngest. 1 hour and 50 min. flat for nine holes, 1 walker and 3 riders not bad. Ready golf is key, and if your in a cart with someone else we always grab a club and split the difference, why wait in the cart.
5/23/12
 
sjm says:
lets face facts. hitting balls, picking clubs is not the problem for amateurs. it's golf courses not mowing rough. if your playing for quarters or dollars you will spend your 5 minutes looking for ball. this can happen 6 or more times a round to one guy. let alone rest of guys in group. keep course to where your ball can be found if halfway decent shot and game will be much quicker. granted some balls don't deserve to be found.
5/23/12
 
DoubleDingo says:
After reading all the comments, pace of play does suck. I quit playing certain courses because of the inevitable 6 hour round. That is 2-2.5 hours wasted that shouldn't be. Ready golf will help, shorter rough will help, working on the fundamentals will help so you can hit better shots even on misses, not grinding over a pre-shot-routine will help, marshals enforcing the pace will help, douche-bags getting over themselves and their mentality of waiting for the green to clear when they're 350 yards from the green will help, people learning golf etiquette will help, people having common courtesy and respect for others will help, informing the slow group of the pace of play rule should help or at least force them to let you play through. Golf courses both private and public not doing anything to help the problem, will not help the problem; if they held golfers to the pace then the golfers would get the hint and speed it up.
5/23/12
 
DoubleDingo says:
I played a public course in Camarillo that has gps units affixed to each cart. It shows where you are on the course and in relation to each hole, and yardages to the hazards and to clear the hazards, where the other carts are in front of you and the yardages to them, and also a time-ticker that shows if you are keeping pace, ahead of pace, or lagging. We were playing in a 4-ball tournament and finished ahead of pace and that was at a casual pace. I need to play that course again, for 5,600 yards from the whites it was still plenty challenging.
5/23/12
 
DoubleDingo says:
One of the local muni's is famous for backing up. You could be playing a sluggish pace and then finish #16 and find yourself waiting for 30 minutes to play the par 3 #17. BS! I only play those slow courses if I can be the first one out when they open so I can be done in 3 hours walking and drive home by 9:30-10:00 a.m. for breakfast.
5/23/12
 
sportsmaniac8C says:
I play in a 4some with friends; none of us are good (only one of us has a HC < 30). However, we have never played a round >4 hrs with no other group slowing us down. On an empty course we usually hit 3.5 hrs. We never spend excessive time searching for balls & we have no problem letting people play thru. We drop the person farthest away from hole at their ball & the other person in cart drives to theirs & then after the 1st person hits they walk up to the 2nd persons ball while they are hitting. This way they meet back up. Also, once we get approx. 80 yds from green, someone (whoever has a ball farthest from cart path) grabs his clubs & walks. We play ready golf around the green we putt by whoever is ready. We finish out short putts without marking and waiting your turn again (unless you are on someone’s line). Last thing, at the tee, we usually tee off based on last hole's score, but if someone isn't ready (walking back to the cart for a club change), we go out of turn.
5/23/12
 
SniderS says:
Its no wonder that some new potential players are not interested (per my experiences). When they get on the course, the first thing that they see is someone coming up behind them. How do you learn and enjoy the game if you're always rushing to accommodate another group pushing you around the course, or worse yet, a marshall. Yes, I am comparing the pace with driving because the culture is the same. People run up on your bumper in the left lane because they try to intimidate you to go faster when your already behind someone else or already exceeding the speed limit. Everyone is so damn busy and in a hurry. I'm just saying, lay off a bit. Stop timing everything. The journey is the destination, otherwise the only destination is under a headstone.
5/23/12
 
Tim Horan says:
Keep up with the group ahead not stay in front of the group behind!
5/24/12
 
snuffyword says:
If we can use a combination of all the suggestions and advice from reading the posts, I think we can make a difference. I agree with keeping up with the group ahead, ready-golf, putting out, etc. If we (everybody) pay attention and be a little more courteous to our playing partners and other groups on the course, a 4-hour round is achievable and should be the norm.
5/24/12
 
lazorbeam says:
Germany and most of Europe requires a license to play golf, Platzreife. Should we move that that system? Maybe, but Sportsmaniac has the right idea, how do we get the word out that this is the normal way to play, or it may come down to a needing license to play.
5/24/12
 
dooboo says:
I think first place for rangers to enforce is the tee box...no handicapper of 15 or higher has no business teeing off from one of the back tees. White should be fine. It is when people don't know where to tee off, it makes the game longer. If your drive is 200 yards, don't tee off from the back blue/black tee. Even 400 yard par 4, you are left with 2nd shot longer than your drive. I see so many people not knowing which tee to tee off from, and make par 4 play like par 5, hence taking longer to finish each hole.
5/24/12
 
stedar says:
Golf Etiquette...
If a penalty shot was added to a players score due to not being ready to play when it is their turn, that will fix 1/2 of the time issue. The biggest area is the Tee, way too often a player is scoring or chatting, rather than waiting with club and ball and tee ready to go. 30secs a hole for that 1 person, that is 10 mins wasted. If there are 2, you lost 20mins. That is only at the TEE...
Another penalty shot added if writing a score next to the green, or parking cart/trundler/bag in front of green, meaning you need to double back to collect rather than move forward to next tee.
Hit the golfer where it hurts, their score. I bet speed of play will not be an issue after that...
5/24/12
 
CeeBee says:
Biggest problem around here? EGO. Playing the wrong tees. No one will move up. I repeat. NO ONE. dooboo has it almost on the money; It's not that they don't know what tee to play, it's that they will not play the tee they should play.

As a side note, I am not really interested in growing the game. By that I mean the TV commercials where you see all those kids hacking around. Imagine the course being attacked by them when you want to get a quick round in after work. It's too crowded now and cost too much as it is.
5/24/12
 
robbie.dejarnette says:
I've carted a round in under 2 hours and walked a round in just over 2.5, shooting in the mid-80s both times, but I played with just one other player and we were first off the tee both days. It seems that people forget that others are out there, too. But, go to Asia and you are expected to play over 5 hours, as it is customary to watch the other players hit their shot then proceed to the next ball and do it again. The cost is so high it is unheard of to play in less than 5 hours and sometimes it will take almost 7 to get through a round, plus it's an all day event with breakfast, a lesson, playing 18, a massage, steam room and dinner all in the price of one round, which can sometimes be near $1000 to play the top courses. Maybe it is Americans that need to slow down and enjoy the surroundings and camaraderie a little more than everyone else that needs to speed it up!
5/25/12
 
Louie A says:
Working as a forecaddie for a number of years the trend I see for slow play is very much influenced by two things. (1) what the everyday golfer sees the pros doing on TV and (2) and way too much general dis-regard and lack of respect, especially from the 20-40 year old group, for the other players on the course. It seems golf is only about drinking, smoking cigars, eating candy bars, and drinking. Louie A.
5/25/12
 
ATEglauer says:
While I agree with almost everything posted here and I believe most of the slow play blame rests with the golfers, I also believe some of it belongs to the course.

What are the tee time intervals at the courses that are notoriously slow? Most of where I play, foursomes (nearly always) are sent out every 7 and 8 minutes. Since none of us are pros, it only takes one guy (or gal) in one group to have a bad hole and then you're holding up the group behind. Like in traffic, just one slow car ends up slowing (or even stopping) the entire freeway with enough traffic. The courses continue to send out foursomes, taking in that extra $250-350 revenue every 7 and 8 minutes, regardless of the pace on the course. I often think that even 9 minute intervals would help quicken the pace (at a cost of less course revenue!).
5/25/12
 
barbajo says:
I think carts are a major factor in slow play...how often do you see guys driving to one ball, waiting to hit and then driving to the other player's ball? Worse yet, folks seem to think that if they have a cart, they get the opportunity to drive closer to the hole to scope out their shot and then drive back -- wouldn't dream of doing that if they were walking.

I'm a middle-aged guy and have given up the cart for walking. Even when I'm playing with 3 other people in carts, I don't feel as thought I'm holding them up at all. Sometimes it's the other way around...
5/26/12
 
rockejm says:
Lately I have been getting behind people that have no business playing the
course I'm on. I think they would have a much better time if they were
Playing a course that suited there abilities. Go play an easier golf course until
figure it out a little bit. And carts are not faster.
6/10/12
 
mdscpa says:
I'm a 61 year old 22 handicap golfer who walks 18 holes in about 3.5 hrs. It is a comfortable pace given that I'm not so straight a hitter. A couple of points. (1) I moved up a set of tees so the course is 6,000 yards and (2)if I can't find my ball, (my eyesight and depth perception stink), I drop and take 2 penalty strokes. If I know I might be OB or in deeeeeep rough, I'll hit a provisional. Unfortunately, sometimes I just lose the ball. If I have a cart, I go back and re-hit but I hate carts.
7/3/12
 
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Terry Koehler is "The Wedge Guy" and President of SCOR Golf- The Short Game Company.

Click here to learn more about Terry.
Click here to for Terry's blogroll.
 
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