Should I Quit Golf?
Dig In or Give It Up?

This seems like a strange topic for a blog post, but a fellow “oob-er” needs our help. I get lots of questions from you guys, and try to cover the topics you are most interested in. But this one from Chris Black seemed worthy of not only my input, but that from all of you, too. Guys, Chris is in a funk about whether to continue playing golf or just give it up. He needs our help. Here’s a paraphrase of what he wrote:

“To golf or not to golf; that is a big question. I have been golfing for about 8 months. I have gone from a beginner to an amateur, but now I am back down the road to suckdom. I have shot a 92 before (legitimate) and now i am lucky to break 110's. I have grown to love the game immensely but I do not think I can keep going. Please help.”

Well, Chris, we’re all here to help, and I’m going to start this off. Then watch what your community of golf “brothers and sisters” chimes in with.

First of all, accept that this is a damn hard game. The idea of taking a ball not much more than 1-1/2” in diameter, striking it with a dizzying array of implements that are not much more than 2” wide, moving it across treacherous real estate to a 4” hole a quarter mile away . . . . well, I think you can see what we golfers challenge ourselves with.

But it all starts with a genuine understanding of what exactly it is you are trying to get your body to do. And my bet is that you have never really achieved that clear understanding. Forget all the tips, lessons and opinions of your friends, and get a copy of Ben Hogan’s “Five Lessons – The Modern Fundamentals of Golf.” You won’t ever swing like Hogan, but you can learn a lot from his in-depth dissection and understanding of the golf swing. In my opinion, no one has ever done it better. This book will give you a solid understanding of just how the body is supposed to function in the golf swing

Then, “get small”. Forget the course and shot outcomes and teach your body to do that “golf swing thing”. Mimic those pictures and positions and learn how a fluid swing feels. Pose and move through the swing positions in front of a full length mirror. See in your mind while you feel what your body is supposed to do to execute a fundamental golf swing.

Spend time with your putter and wedges in your hands, hitting putts of all distances and short chips and pitches. These strokes happen slower than the full swing and are easy to analyze and learn. Once you have the feel of solid impact and fluid tempo on these scoring shots, move on out to the fuller swings with the same feel.

And finally, accept that, in the words of John Madden, “you never ‘get’ golf”. It is challenging game that sees tour professionals shoot 80 on occasion, and a 59-year old Tom Watson “take it to the kids” at another. Be easy on yourself as you learn and enjoy all the aspects of the game – the score is only a small part of it. Outdoors, fascinating architecture, fresh air . . . the benefits are numerous. And I know that of all my lifelong friends, the vast majority came from golf. I’ll bet most of you “oob-ers” are the same, right?

Like anything worth having, it doesn’t come easy, but it is darn well worth the journey. Chris, take the time, and give the attention to try to “get golf”, and it will reward you many times over. It is truly the game of a lifetime.

OK, “oob-ers”, what do you have to share with Chris?
The Wedge Guy is sponsored by SCOR Golf, where Terry Koehler is President/CEO. He encourages you to submit your questions or topics to be considered for his columns on Tuesdays and Fridays. Each submission automatically enters you to win a SCOR4161 wedge to be given away monthly. Click the button below to submit your question or topic today.


[ comments ]
klangdon says:
I don't think you should base the decision of quiting on how good you are or how much your improving. Its about how much you enjoy playing. Ya, you have to be somewhat satisfied with your performance. But this isn't a job, its just for fun. Focus on finding enjoyment in it vs shooting a 90.
7/28/09
 
Banker85 says:
as long as your having fun keep playing, if your not then maybe you should quit. I hate playing with people who dont have a good time on the course.
7/28/09
 
Kickntrue says:
Chris- consider this. You just won the best wedge available in golf. That's a good reason not to quit. Break rounds into 2 or 3 hole mini-games. Try to win more of the mini games than you lose over the course of a round. Make the games things like- "in these three holes I'm going to hit 1 fairway, and make 1 putt that ends up less than 3 feet from the hole." Start increasing the difficulty of the mini-games as you improve, but you're never gonna shoot an 80 right away (or ever)- so win the battles you can.
7/28/09
 
Patrick McKay says:
If you can afford a bit of extra time, the satisfaction you get from breaking through your current slump will be incredible. It is important to realize that every player at every level hits a plateau before taking the next step.

Before I broke 90, I started to shoot high 90s because I was putting too much pressure on myself. Go out and have fun again, enjoy your good shots and more will come.
7/28/09
 
Backquak says:
forget your score, you don't have to play well to enjoy the game. remember Tin Cup, sex and golf are two of the only things you don't have to be good at to enjoy. I'm sure thats not exactly how he said it, and even if you gamble with your buddies there are ways to enjoy the game without scoring well,

but lots of practice does help in both cases ;)
7/28/09
 
k-von says:
I second P-Gunna's comment: it seems to me that the more difficult the struggle; the more rewarding the resolution. If you find that you're topping or shanking every ball, ask somebody to watch your swing closely and help you analyze what you're doing wrong. Everything is correctable and once you fix what ails you the game will be even more enjoyable.
7/28/09
 
mjaber says:
I'm kind of in the same boat as Chris. I shot a 96 last season (my first season playing golf) and thought I was on my way. I'm hitting the ball better, and longer, than last year, but can't seem to get out of the 100's. Where I differ is that I have no intention of giving up the game any time soon. Never even gave it a serious thought. I see my rounds of golf as time spent outside, enjoying the fresh air, and having fun with some friends. When I was younger, that 4-5 hours hanging out with friends was in a smokey bar with loud music playing, drinking until last call and playing pool.
7/28/09
 
mjaber says:
I've given up smoking, and I've grown up enough to realize that much drinking and then driving home, even after an hour in the coffe shop, is not a smart thing to do. So, off to the golf course with a couple buddies. I have no real aspirations on the golf course. Sure, I'd like to improve, and I have started taking some lessons to that end, but the time outside with friends is the real reward for me.

When we were kids, we didn't need an excuse to go outside. We went out just to "play." There was no goal, other than to get outside and be with our friends. As I got older, there became a need to have a reason to leave the house, at least for me. I wasn't going to just go walk down the street and see who was around.
7/28/09
 
mjaber says:
I spent too much time on my computer or in front of the TV. My wife is glad I stared playing golf, because she thought I spent too much time inside. On more than one occasion, she has suggested, and on others insisted, that I either go play golf or go to the driving range. She wanted me to go outside, and knew that I wouldn't if I didn't have somewhere to go and something to do.

That's what golf gives me. Somewhere to go, and something to do... outside.

My best advice for Chris, if your scores are making you crazy, then play a couple rounds and don't keep score. Just go chase the little white ball around for a few hours. Laugh when you lose one in the water. Chuckle when you hit the same tree twice, and remember that Padraig Harrington has done the same thing. Look around you before you hit your shot, and enjoy your surroundings. Bring a camera with you and take some pictures.
7/28/09
 
mjaber says:
Sorry, I went a little overboard. :)
7/28/09
 
Kickntrue says:
Chris- if you're reading this- where do you live? Maybe you just need a round with some oobers!
7/28/09
 
bducharm says:
I was going to offer a couple of lessons if Chris was close by - I am in Austin TX...
7/28/09
 
greendevil says:
To get the fun back in golf; I would suggest Chris go play some 4-man best ball golf scrambles. Scrambles are a blast and after all, scrambles provide a team aspect that enables a golfer to enjoy the game without the seemingly added pressure we put on ourselves during stroke play.
7/28/09
 
NWGaEagle says:
One suggestion - play in a handicap league with some friends or colleagues. Some of those where they score based on hole performance. So bogey = +1, par = +2, birdie = +4, eagle = +8. Then you have some score that you need to pull (yours would be a 4 on nine holes in ours just because 4 is our minimum) while scratch golfers need to pull somewhere around 18+.

Playing in those is really helpful to shrugging off those bad holes and then really enjoying those that you point on. The more you play the more you'll figure out ways to limit those holes you didn't point on. And before you know it, you might be looking at a round where you are posting points pretty regular.

That kind of scoring was much better for my enjoyment ... and I still shoot 110 on occasion :)
7/28/09
 
mmontisano says:
my 4 cents:

1. pick a tour player with a similar body type and build as you and watch their swing. you can find swing sequences everywhere on the internet. try to mimic what they do.

2. i haven't read Hogan's book, but what he said is true. The secret is in the dirt. practice.

3. the book i have read is Harvey Penick's Little Red Book. it gives you lessons in the form of stories and is really easy to relate to.

4. relax and have fun. standing over a shot, the only swing though going through my head is "just hit the ball." keeping it simple and enjoying your friends company will do wonders.
7/28/09
 
Ward says:
for me, the value of playing golf is not so much in the scoring, but in the time spent in nature away from cell phones/work/life's hassles
7/28/09
 
doubleeagle says:
If it were me, I'd take a handful of golf lessons. With a little work on your part, they will transform your game.

Golf is a strange sport. It can be costly to play. A decent course will probably run $30 to $60 per round with much higher greens fees for nicer courses. Memberships run from several hundred dollars to many thousands. We'll spend $500 on a new driver, $150 on a new putter, or $45/dz. for balls in an effort to improve, but in general, people don't want to shell out $50 for a lesson. I don't understand it.

Even if playing golf already stretches the budget thin, simply replace a round for a lesson. If you play once every weekend, then every 4th weekend, take a lesson instead.

The results may not be immediate, but you will absolutely, positively improve if you find a good pro who is suited to you, and if you work on the things you are given to work on.
7/28/09
 
jerdman says:
All it takes is one shot to make you want to keep playing. A great shot gets stuck in my head for days despite how bad a round I played and I can't wait to play again. I'll never give up the game without getting a stupid hole-in-one first.
Play the game for the memorable moments, theres bound to be some good ones that last a lifetime.
7/28/09
 
woobwoob says:
If you are stuck in the 100s, my best guess is that you are still trying to muscle the ball down the fairway. Relax and hit a smooth swing. This is the hardest lesson I've had to learn, and one I still struggle with from time to time. Take as many practice swings as you need in order to find the shot you are trying to hit.

In addition, if you mishit your drive on a par four, don't necessarily put yourself in a position to fail by trying to hit a highly unlikely shot to correct your error. Accept that you may bogey the hole, punch back into the fairway, and get on in 3. Who knows, you could 1-putt.

Once I am able to relax and not worry about the shot, I tend to shoot very well.
7/28/09
 
Bryan K says:
I also say....get some lessons. I'm trying to find a place to fit in my next lesson.

I'm also in a similar funk. My game has taken three steps back over the past couple of weeks.

My recommendation is to try an easier course like a pitch 'n' putt course. Take it one swing at a time. Each swing is a new challenge.

I'm so anxious to get back on the course right now, it hurts. Also, you might be better off if you took a week or two away from the game. Furthermore, if you've only been playing 8 months, and you've shot a 92 on a regulation size course, you've advanced extremely quickly. You're probably due for a setback.

I think most importantly, though, is you need to remember why you started playing in the first place. For me, it's all about excercise.
7/28/09
 
Virtuaframax says:
ive been playing pretty much the same amount time as you... i started late last season and broke 100.. i started this season pretty strong with a legit 95 and then went completely downhill (110 and mid 100s). i realize im playing better, i strike the ball better, but the score doesnt show it. however, im not giving it up for anything in the world, cause when im out there, i feel free, my mind doesnt think of all the problems or issues i have.
7/28/09
 
Virtuaframax says:
sounds to me that you are a competitive person like me and you want to improve right away. Im the same, but this frustrating game and exciting game doesnt allow you to do it. just relax, forget about the score and focus on what you need to improve. sure, the score at the beginning won't be encouraging, but it will come!
7/28/09
 
aaronm04 says:
Three little things:

1) Read. The book Terry mentioned is great. I have a copy and refer to it at times. Add to that list Golf Is Not A Game of Perfect by Bob Rotella. It explores the mental aspect of golf and says nothing about mechanics. Between these two books, you'll get most of the information you need to be a good golfer.

2) Take some lessons. Many golfers don't. Everyone will have their own issues. You can get some basics as well as some tips. This can help you find your tendencies and can help you find what a good swing FEELS like which is important.

3) Practice your short game. A lot. Many amateurs don't. I see so many guys at my club that spend all their time at the range doing nothing but full swings. It will take a lot of strokes off your game and (for me at least) it will even help your full swing.

If golf was easy, everyone would be good at it. Golf takes time and patience. Keep at it.
7/28/09
 
KVSmith59 says:
just have fun. Pick one part of your game, i.e. putting, off the tee, etc, and concentrate on that part and that part only until you get it to where you want it, then move on to the next part. For example, make your putting goal an average of 2 putts per hole. Once you reach that goal or get close to it, then work on your FIR's. IMHO, putting is where you can shave off the most strokes within a short period of time. My friends used to routinely beat me by 5 or 6 strokes each round. At the time I was 3 putting alot. I started working on my putting, got it down to 2 putts per hole, and suddenly I was right with them every round....Look at it this way, would you rather spend 4 or 5 hours with your friends on the course, or 4 or 5 hours in your backyard pulling weeds??
7/28/09
 
kidputter says:
Think of all the reasons you play. If you're playing to get on the tour, quit. If you're playing for the sheer love of the game, just play the game. Scoring is great but golf is golf. See your club pro and have him analyze your setup and grip. That alone can make all the difference.
7/28/09
 
Mr. Black says:
wow guys....thanks for all the comments i definitely appreciate. i live in san jose, ca and i am always looking for new people to play the game with. and if i really did win a wedge then i i definitely can't give it up can i? lol.
7/28/09
 
Lerxst says:
Don't quit! --- Keep swimming - keep swimming - keep swimming.... :)
7/28/09
 
andystewart71405 says:
Scoring is only one aspect of golf. I still remember how I could have shaved a few strokes off my career best scores. I just started lessons, and you get worse before you get better (for me - worse was almost an extra stroke per hole - not good!) But stick with it, and you'll get better.

One thing that has helped me when I was not shooting as well - I didn't wait on my shots or put as long. My made practice swing, picked my line, and got over the ball and hit it. No stopping to think about past shots, just getting over the ball and concentrating on the swing (or putt) I've practiced and I know I can make. Funny thing - my buddy who played college golf, and usually shoots close to par - when he doesn't take long on putts, does a lot better. When he stands over the putt and thinks, never gets close.
7/28/09
 
falcon50driver says:
28 comments all telling you not to quit, keep plugging, get lessons, practice more. I say if you're not having fun, QUIT. To tell you the truth I'm cutting WAY back. It's gotten to the point where I can't seem to get any better and I just don't need the frustration. I'm going to start spending more time with one of my previous hobbies, drag racing. I will probably still play when I'm on a trip, but very little anymore at home.
7/28/09
 
Josh says:
Ok let me be the first to say it.. the picture of the golf ball with the red circle and slash through it is incredibly and awesomely terrible. It's so bad I almost find it becoming good.

Chris don't stop playing, I've been way to busy to get out this summer and it's killing me if you have the time; get out and enjoy it.

And Lerxst, congrats for what I think is the first ever Finding Nemo reference dropped in an oob comment.
7/29/09
 
Lerxst says:
@Josh

Somebody got it! :)
7/29/09
 
adamgolfer says:
Chris,
Since I am newbie at this game, my recommendation/suggestion would be not to to quit. Why not take a little break from it? It's obvious that you have invested a great deal amount of resources ranging from time to capital into it. Look at the amount of money that you are going to throw away by trying to sell all of your golf equipments and not to mention all the friends that you made this far in your golf journey. You are looking at your score and not why you are getting these scores. Take a refresher course... Also, re-visit the primary reason for getting into golf to begin with. Finally, are you striving for a spot on the PGA? If not, there's your sign...
After all, this game's addiction is "too leggit to quit"!
7/29/09
 
tomohr says:
8 months in the scheme of Golf is nothing. I've been playing for a month and I am consistent, but I know there are things I can improve on! You just have to know what is weak about your game and go out there and fix it. That is half the fun. Cause you know the first time that you get back in to the low 90's it is going to be the best feeling in the world! keep your chin up
7/29/09
 
DRUMatthias says:
Chris, you're doing a GREAT job with this game. Geez, 8 months & broke 100? I've played off & on for 15+ years (taking it much more seriously since 2005) & usually don't break 100. In fact just last weekend, I had 2 very high scores on different 9-hole courses. The first felt pretty descent, hitting a few fairways & blasting a few controllable drives & <100yard shots but I 3-putted almosted every hole. 2 days later, I played 9 on a tight-fairway course lined with houses on EVERY hole...my full swings were all but horrible, taking me WAY too many shots to get to the green and landing in more bunkers (like a magnet) than I'd hit in several rounds combined. BUT, I two-putted on average and even par'd the last hole! The game is full of surprises and has everything to do with consistency that comes from practice and a POSITIVE mental state. You WILL swing better over time.
7/29/09
 
DRUMatthias says:
You WILL break 100, break 90 over time. Stick with it & it WILL happen. And hang on to those moments like my par on a 195yard par-3 Sunday, & my 80+ foot putt I sunk on a rippled green to save par in a scramble last year (we took 3rd!). Those moments ALWAYS keep me coming back! They should for you too!
7/29/09
 
Mr. Black says:
thanks everyone for your support. i am happy to say i went to the range today and with the help of a friend of mine my swing is back on track (or on plane lol). i feel great and im looking forward to playing monday.
7/29/09
 
jwilder78 says:
I'm glad you're gonna stick with it, but I completely understand the frustration that comes with golf. I think players of all skill levels hit a wall, have a few bad rounds, throw their hands up and say, "why the hell am I spending all this time and money on this f'ing game?!!"

In some ways, golf is entirely unrewarding b/c it requires such a commitment to get good, and the game is just so damn hard to begin with, as Terry said. But like many others have mentioned, set some realistic expectations, and just savor those one or two moments per round that felt really good. Even just one good swing that feels pure is satisfying enough to bring me back for another round.
7/29/09
 
jwilder78 says:
I think the best suggestions offered here are:
1) Get a lesson -- I got a brief lesson and it made a huge difference...there's just so much advice being thrown at golfers today, from magazines, to commentators, to advertisements, most of which is useless, that having one trusted source of guidance that's tailored to YOU is invaluable.
2) Play a scramble, then you focus only on the good shots and just flush the bad ones. I've never ever had a round that wasn't fun when playing like this.

Finally, my advice would be to always try to play with a golf buddy (or 2 or 3 if you can). No matter how you play, hanging out with a friend on a nice day can't be beat. And play cheaper courses. Then it's much easier to write off a bad round. That's my strategy of "Value Golf"!
7/29/09
 
Optimus Prime says:
Every course is different. Try playing courses with lower slope rating. I stop keeping score when I get frustrated.

For me, there are far more important things to focus on than the score for beginners. I started journaling after each round, keeping notes on where I had problems and the good things I did. I started focusing on fairways, greens in regulation, and hitting my irons (lessons help). By improving these things, I found I took the pressure off my putting which was also pitiful.

My other suggestion is to think of golf in stages. For me, I break it down to long game, short game, putting, course and anger management. Not all of these are giving you problems I hope.

Lastly, there is no substitute for practice. You have to hit a ton of balls to get good.
7/29/09
 
blackhawk says:
I started out just trying to beat the slope of the course. Now I am trying to make small improvements and eventually break 100. The main thing however, is to have fun.

If you're like Billy Martin and throw things when your kid beats you at "Chutes and Ladders", then you really shouldn't be playing golf.

Relax, take a deep breath and explore the rough you just hit the ball into.
7/30/09
 
ToddRobb says:
The only way to get better at this game is to work at it. If you don't have the time, patience and persistence to put in the work that is required to improve your game, you won't improve. You can't show up at the course once or twice a week and expect your game to get better. I have an Aunt that swears to me that she wants to get better, but when I ask her if she practices, I get get a wry smile, which means no. Everyone wants to play better golf, only a small percentage are actually willing to punch the clock every day and put in the time to work on their game. If you're not trying to improve, your game will be what it is, if you don't like what it is, either decide to improve and step up, or give the game up.
7/30/09
 
tpreston says:
I have only been playing the game for about a year myself. I went from shooting 125 plus when I started to shooting mid 80's a month ago. I was playing almost everyday and I got a swing coach to get rid of my horrible slice. then due to work and marriage I only get a chance to play about once a week and now shoot in the mid 90s. talk about discouraging. my advice for you would be to start with the basics again, practice, and remember that there are alot of guys that have been playing alot longer than 8 months that are shooting 110s and still enjoy the game.
7/30/09
 
Tim Horan says:
I have been playing for some 40 years on and off. Playing off 10 at present and still get deep depressions and threaten to give it all up. When I get that low I go out early mornings (in the summer) before anyone is around and play on my own. If you make a bad shot...drop another ball, make a good shot and take that feeling to the next shot. Take the good feeling from those good shots to the next round. There is nothing worse than going to the range if you are beating yourself up on bad shots; you need to see and live the results of your good shots and you can only do that on course.
7/30/09
 
jstech73 says:
<------ There is a reason why i look this way, 32 handicap and still having fun.
7/30/09
 
GBorn says:
I practice putting and hitting balls at the range. My problem is at the course, if I have a bad shot or lousy hole I'm a head case and can't recover. The mental game drives me to want to quit somedays...but it is also what keeps me coming back. Keep after it!
7/30/09
 
onedollarwed says:
Very sobering comments from MJaber - not overboard!
I started playing in high school and it was free. I scraped up ancient equipment from my grandfathers and uncles - rusty, slick real leather grips, cracked woods, a bag with broken zippers. All of my balls I found. In college I borrowed clubs, and still had only ever payed for greens fees. I plyed because friends were playing and got pretty good immediate results - as far as hitting the ball, but really didn't keep score or compete in any way for years. The joy, the pure joy, was smacking the snot out of the ball and watching it fly - occasionally with deft control. Soon it was obvious that I enjoyed it way more than my friends and also had the knack for learning and improving and caring about scoring - that was about 20yrs down the line. Had to move on from my friends and the social aspects of the game in order to improve and find new cooperative relationships with the game.
7/30/09
 
onedollarwed says:
At one point a few years back I was working in three fields simultaneously: Prisons, Special Education, and Golf Instruction. I have long been a teacher in many fields - mostly art and music. In these cases, all three fields required carrying out specific plans for improvement. Setting goals and working toward them, regularly measuring and evaluating progress and pedagogy, and deciding how to procede, etc.
BY FAR!!!!!! Golfers made the least progress!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
There is something shattering to the ego about golf - you need to be able to accept wild fluctuations in performance. Or, abandon scoring until you're really hitting the ball.
We all miss 2 footers, We all shank the ball sometimes - with no explanation. I'm sure most golfers would accept exactly a one stroke improvement per year in their handicap. But no, we think we deserve the 10 stroke improvement in one week!
7/30/09
 
windowsurfer says:
I'm goin to the range!
7/30/09
 
Sumtingwong says:
I have had similar conversations in my head about quitting but then find myself picking up a club and going through some slow motion swing drills. I then tell myself that I must press through the pain, lower my expectations and be more patient. Have fun with it otherwise it is just another job that is not enjoyable!
8/12/09
 
matt314hew says:
Chris,

Like everyone has said, Don't quit.

When i go out and play, i normally have a few bad holes and I get frustrated. But it is coming back and doing better than those holes that makes me happy. When i go out and play, what I like to do is set up a goal for me. I usually shoot in the high 80's to low 90's.

I fill out the score card before i play. I will look at the par and the handicap for that hole and write down what I think i will get on that hole. Then i figure out my 18 hole score on what I want to shoot. Then i try and beat that.

I also figure out how many putts i want to have for the day. So for 18 holes, i usually shoot for 30 putts or less.

Then I look at Greens in Regulation and Fairway's hit. I try to hit 4 of 18 greens and 4 of 14 fairways normally. I usually struggle to hit greens and fairways, which is one reason those numbers are low.
8/12/09
 
KVSmith59 says:
ok, if you look at my stats you'll seen how inconsistent I am. I'll shoot an 89 one day and the very next round I'll shoot a 97. One of my biggest problems has been off the tee - I'll hit 3 fairways in a row, then start spraying it everywhere. So, I went out and bought a new driver with a higher loft than what I've been using the last 15 years. That definitely helped. I'm not neccessarily getting any more FIR's, but my bad shots are not close to as bad as before and they are ending up in the playable rough verses deep in the woods or OB.
8/22/09
 
KVSmith59 says:
cont'd:

I've basically been self taught with a couple of one hour lessons thrown in here and there and thousands of pieces of advice from friends. Some of the lessons helped and some of tips from friends helped...for a round or two, and then back to my crappy game. I then ran across this post and the best piece of advice I've ever had. That piece of advice was to buy and read Ben Hogan's 5 Lessons. My first advice after seeng the Wedge Guy post info about it was why do I want to read a book that was written initially in 1957 when there are thousands of videos and books out there from "modern" golfers using modern technology. I checked for reviews on the book and decided what the hell. The book was only $10 and I've spent more than that on gizmos and such.
8/22/09
 
KVSmith59 says:
cont'd:

So I buy the book and have played two rounds applying the "lessons" in the first two chapters, Grip and Posture/Setup. What a huge difference...not so much in the scores (95 with two blow up holes) and an 89. However, the ability to hit the ball more solidly than I have in many years was an eye opener. My grip has been modified so much since I started playing that it was basically all screwed up. Going back to the basic fundamentals at age 49 has made more of a difference than I ever thought it would. I know two rounds doesn't seem like it would, but I can easily tell the difference between my old swing and my "new" swing. Much more than I could explain it here. If you are struggling with your game, no matter what your handicap, I highly recommend getting this book. Thanks Wedge Guy for the advice.
8/22/09
 
george44 says:
Hi,I ran across this site while googling "should i quit golf?" ive been playing for 15 years and have settled into shooting anywhere between 84-92 most rds.my best score was a 78 on a full course,ive shot 73 and numerous 74's on the local 5600 yd course,i dont consider those scores legit because the course isnt what i consider a full course.I have reached a plateau.my score doesnt get any better.i beat myself up after a bad shot..not so much offline but if i top or hit a fat shot it pisses me off to no end.I used to enjoy golf when trying to break 80 but now its seems like work most times.
I also am pissed off with my driver,i never really hit it to my potential,maybe 230-240yds..my game is pretty conservative,short drive down the fairway,2nd shot close to the green or on and 2 or 3 putts..pretty boring.ive been thinking about giving up the game and using the 5k on something more useful.
1/3/10
 
wedgeguy says:
Well, I hope this post and all the comments have changed your mind. Golf is a fascinating journey of self-examination, and nothing is quite so sweet as a well-struck shot. Make those moments your "payoff" and accept that golf is not a game that is "numerically gratifying". Forget the numbers and enjoy the experience.
1/3/10
 
george44 says:
thanks,does anybody have any idea why i cant drive the ball? im 5'10 225lbs,i lifted weights,im strong ,i swing slow,try to swing in tempo,iam conscious to try and follow thru but nothing helps,im always the shortest driver in my group,but probably the most athletic and strongest? i dont get it? or should this be in another thread? thx
1/4/10
 
tmm says:
yes, you should quit.
10/13/12
 
exercisegolf says:
I started golfing two years ago (this is my third season). Golf has become a passion for me, and yet I seldom break 100 (I actually play 9 holes most of the time, so my "100" is actually two games in a row where I score 50). The motivation for me to practice and improve has been the exercise I get. I walk the course (unless I am with cart driving golf buddies) and I walk a lot when I practice hitting foam balls in my yard. Just by practicing every day, I lost 25 pounds and feel much better. I am still trying constantly to improve my swing and lower my scores, but meanwhile, golfing for exercise is much more fun than running on a treadmill at the gym. For a better aerobic workout, I accidently leave my sand wedge by the green of the previous hole and have to run back very fast to get it when I discover it's lost :) I have no intention of quitting (I mean golf, not losing sand wedges!)
5/27/14
 
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Terry Koehler is "The Wedge Guy" and President of SCOR Golf- The Short Game Company.

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